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SC ENGL 102 - Third Party Organization for NCAA Athlete

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Post Introduction:Yes. However, the solution is not direct pay from the institutions. The solution is allowing third-party compensation as well as empowering these student-athletes within the NCAA.Support:Third party pay would be crucial in allowing college athletes to live comfortably while they are at school. This could be in exchange for event appearances, endorsements, or commercial advertisements. This concept, similar to that of the Olympics, would allow athletes to profit without the added financial strain on the universities. These universities, unlike common belief, cannot afford to pay student athletes. Only 23 division-one athletic departments made a profit in 2012 according to ESPN and almost all were on some form of subsidy. This resolution would not introduce these athletic departments to further financial strain. This would also protect these institutions from having to decide on who gets paid, whether it is the moneymaking sport participants or all athletes at the school. This change would be an important step forward for the NCAA in regards to taking care of its players. I played a year of college soccer at a school in Virginia. Between spending 80 hours per week on the field and countless hours in the library, I had no other way to make money. Even in the off-season, I did not have time to even work a part time job. These division one football and basketball players have even less of an opportunity. Scholarships do not cover everything. According to Zach Gorwitz of the Duke Political Review, “the average annual scholarship shortfall (out of pocket expenses) for each Football Bowl Series (FBS) “full scholarship” athlete was $3,285.” That is not even including basic necessities such as toothpaste. Shabazz Napier, prominent basketball player for the University of Connecticut, recently exposed the struggles of an NCAA athlete to the world. He, and many like him, struggles to make ends meetand go hungry. These athletes give devote every minute of their lives to their sport and, in turn, deserve the right to live without financial struggle. This would allow them to make some money while improving their public image without any negative consequences on the NCAA or its member institutions.These players should also be allowed to hold more power within the NCAA. It is not just a financial issue; these athletes are not being put on track to be successful after they graduate. They are being directed towards easy and worthless majors so that the school is assured thereathletes will remain academically eligible to play. Kain Colter, former quarterback for Northwestern University, aspired to be a doctor after he graduated. Through is career, however, he was directed towards easier classes and this prevented him from graduating with his intended major.This is not an isolated incident. At the University of North Carolina, players were taking fake, no attendance classes where grades were given for little to no work. This may have seemed beneficial for the players at the time, but it set them up for failure post-graduation. These athletes, through their time and dedication, have earned the right to a meaningful education and deserve the utmost concern regarding their


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