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UA PSY 101 - Adolescence

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PSYCH 101 1st Edition Lecture 9Outline of Last Lecture I. Cognitive Development: Jean PiagetA. Assimilation and AccommodationB. The course of Developmental Stages1. Assimilation and Accommodation2. The Course of Developmental StagesII. Sensory Motor Stage- Object PermanenceIII.Preoperational Stage-Conservation-Egocentrism-Developing Theory of MindIV.Concrete Operational StageV.Formal Operational StageVI.Lev Vygotsky: Alternative to PiagetVII.Social Development: AttachmentA.Origins of AttachmentB.Origins of Attachment FamiliarityVIII. Attachment Variation: Styles of dealing with Separation1. Secure Attachment2. Insecure Attachment (anxious style)3. Insecure Attachment (avoidant style)A. What causes the different attachment styles: Nature or NurtureB. Deprivation of Attachment IX. Childhood: Self ConceptX. Childhood: Hypothetical Parenting Styles1. Authoritarian2. Permissive3. AuthoritativeA. Outcomes with Parenting Styles Outline of Current Lecture I. Physical DevelopmentII. Adolescent Brain DevelopmentIII. Cognitive DevelopmentA. Building Toward Moral ReasoningThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.B. Lawrence Kohlberg’s Levels of Moral ReasoningC. Moral IntuitionIV. Social DevelopmentA. Influences on identity: Peer and Parent RelationshipsB. Emerging adulthoodCurrent LectureI. Physical Development- Lifespan perspective refers to the idea that development is a lifelong process. The next phase is adolescence, the transition period from childhood to adulthood.- Puberty is the time of sexual maturation (becoming physically able to reproduce). During puberty, increased sex hormones lead to:- Primary and secondary sex characteristics- Some mood and behavior changes- Height changes are an early sign of pubertyII. Adolescent Brain Development- During puberty the brain stops automatically adding new connections and becomes more efficient by “rewiring”- “Pruning” away the connections not being used- Coating the well used connections in myelin, in order to speed up nerve conduction- This makes early adolescence a crucial time to learn as much as you can - Frontal lobes are the last to rewire; the emotional limbic system gets wired for puberty before the frontal judgment centers of the brain get wired for adulthood. As a result, adolescents may understand risks and consequences, but give more weight to potential thrills and rewards.III. Cognitive Development- According to Piaget, adolescents are in the formal operational stage, they use this reasoning to:- Think about how reality compares to ideal- Think hypothetically about different choices and their consequences- Plan how to pursue goals- Think about the minds of others, including,” What do they think ofme?”A. Building Toward Moral Reasoning- Adolescents see justice and fairness in terms of merit and equity instead of in terms of everyone getting equal treatment- They may strive to advocate for ideals and political causes- They may think about god, meaning, and purpose in deeper terms than in childhood.B. Lawrence Kohlberg’s Levels of Moral Reasoning1. Preconventional Morality up to age 9. Follow the rules because if you don’t, you’ll get in trouble; if you do, you might get a reward.2. Conventional Morality early adolescence. Follow the rules because we get along better if everyone does the right thing.3. Postconventional MoralityLater adolescence and adulthood. Sometimes rules need to be set aside to pursue higher principles.C. Moral Intuition- Haidt said that moral decisions are often driven by moral intuition, that is, quick gut feeling decisions. This intuition isn’t based just in moral reasoning but also in emotions such as disgust and elevated feelings.IV. Social Development- Erickson’s model of lifelong psychological development see’s adolescence as a struggle to form an identity, a sense of self, out of the social roles adolescents areasked to play.- For Erickson the challenge in adolescence was to test and integrate roles in order to prevent role confusion (which of those selves, or what combination is really me?)- Some teens solve this problem simply by adopting one role by parents or peers.A. Influences on identity: Peer and Parent Relationships- During adolescence, peer relationships take center stage- Adolescents often still see their parents as the primary influence in many areas, including career, religion, and politics.B. Emerging Adulthood- In some countries added years of education and later marriage has delayed full adult independence beyond traditional adolescence. This seems to have created a new phase which can be called emerging adulthood, ages 18-25. (i.e. they have more freedom, but maybe they live at home while they go to


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