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UNT MUMH 1600 - Exam 1 Study Guide

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MUMH 1600 1st EditionExam # 1 Study Guide The exam will consist of three parts: Multiple Choice, Listening Identification, and Short-Answer Questions. You will have the full class period in which to complete the exam. Bring apencil to use on the scantron form (we will provide the scantron form).Multiple Choice (20 questions, worth 30 points) These questions will be similar to questions from the daily quizzes, and they will be based onmaterial from the daily study guides (Key Terms, People, and Repertoire). You should know thedefinition of each Key Term and why it is relevant. You should know the dates of People(early/middle/late in the century) and why they are relevant. See below for Repertoire guidelines.Listening Identification (20 questions, worth 40 points) These questions will be similar to questions from the daily quizzes. For each example, youshould know the title, composer, date of composition (early/middle/late in the century), andgenre. You should also review the Elements of Music that we discussed in class related to eachexample. These questions will draw from the following repertoire list:Hildegard von Bingen, Play of Virtues (Ordo Virtuitum ca. 1150)- Monophonic Liturgical Drama - Morality Play Francesco Landini, “Behold Spring” (Ecco La Primavera)- Polyphonic Ballata/ Secular Song- Triple Meter - AbbaAGuillaume de Machaut, “I Can All Too Well Compare My Lady” - (Je Puis Trop Bien)- Polyphonic Ballade- aabCJosquin des Prez, “The Cricket” (Renaissance Polyphonyca. 1500)- Secular Song- Ternary Form: ABAThomas Weelkes, “Since Robin Hood” (Madrigal ca. 1608)- Word Painting- PolyphonicCarlo Gesualdo, “‘I Depart,’ and I Said No More”William Byrd, “Sing Joyfully” (1590)- Anthem (A Capella choral work)- Imitative Counterpoint- Word-Music Relationships: word paintingWeek 1:1. Rhythm (general) Beat2. Meter3. Rhythm (as in, “a rhythm”)4. Tempo5. Melody6. Harmony Chord Consonance Dissonance Tonality Major7. Minor8. Texture Monophonic Homophonic Polyphonic9. Timbre Dynamics Form10.Word-Music Relationships11.Genre Week 2:1. Middle Ages/medieval era2. Plainchant/Gregorian chant3. Syllabic4. Melismatic5. Scribe6. People7. Pope Gregory I (“the Great”)8. Liturgical Drama9. Morality Play10.Troubadour11.Courtly Love12. Ballata13. Ballade14.Francesco Landini15. Guillaume de MachautWeek 3:1. Renaissance2. Humanism3. Reformation4. Martin Luther5. Anthem6. Imitation/imitative counterpoint7. Word painting8. A cappella9. Josquin des Prez10.William Byrd11.Madrigal12.Carlo Gesualdo13.Thomas WeelkesShort Answer Questions (3 questions, worth 30 points) You will write a paragraph of 3–5 complete sentences answering each question. The questionson the exam will be taken from the following (based on the Questions for Study):What was the purpose of Play of Virtues? Describe three ways in which the music helpsto fulfill this goal.Describe one way in which the songs of the troubadours were similar to secular songs inthe 14th c. Then, using one of our examples of 14th c. secular song (title and composer),describe two ways in which the 14th c. example is different from the troubadours’ music.First, name and briefly describe the important intellectual and cultural movement thathelped differentiate the Renaissance from the Middle Ages. Then, describe one way inwhich this new perspective affected music. Using one of our pieces from the Renaissance(title and composer), give one specific example to illustrate your point.How did the Reformation affect sacred music in the sixteenth century? Using our sacredexample from the Renaissance (title and composer), describe two ways in which thispiece seems to follow the ideals of the Reformation. Then, describe one way in which itdoes not.Describe two ways in which the English madrigal is similar to the Italian madrigal andtwo ways in which they are different (text in English vs. text in Italian does not count).Using one of our repertoire examples (title and composer), give one specific example toillustrate one of these similarities or


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