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JMU GHIST 101 - Ancient Rome

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Ghist 101 1st Edition Lecture 11 Outline of Last Lecture I. Aristotle II. Greek Drama a. Tragic Poets III. Peloponnesian WarIV. Alexander the Greata. Hellenistic Society i. Three Kingdomsii. Hellenism V. Greek Philosophiesa. Stoicism VI. Greek Societies a. Euclid b. Archimedesc. HerophilusOutline of Current Lecture II. Romea. Lasting effects of Roman rule b. Etruscan civilization c. Greek Colonization d. Foundation myth of Rome e. Early Republic These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.Current Lecture- Rome o Difference between Greece and Romeo Lasting effects of Roman rule Languages Calendar Alphabet Vision of conquest  Universal values- Rome was the first and last empire that controlled Europe - One of the three empires in the western tradition that had ever lasting inferences - One of the two most powerful/wealthy empires in the classical period o Historical sources  Use to study the roman empire  Filled with tales/fabricated stories  Detailed accounts of their constitution o Etruscans and the Greeks Migration of the Etruscans - From the eastern Mediterranean - Expansion and declination  Etruscan civilization - Synthesis - Religiono Worship Greek Gods - Languageo The language is not deciphered o Not Indo-European language Greek colonization- Greek colonies often cut off religion – did not pay allegiance to mother country - Sicily and southern Italy- Impacts  Foundation Myth of Rome - Romulus and Remus o Children of Marso nursed by a she-wolf Wolf milk made them more violent  Romulus killed his own brother Remus and foundedRome- Greek Versiono Aeneas from Troy- “Seven Kings” in the regal period 753-509 BC o All kings were upright kings except the last one – the last king was evil o The reason for the end of the regal period was a foreign invasion and they lost their king o Not a historical story o Early Republic (509-280 BC)  Patricians and Plebeians - Tensions and struggles <- traditional view - Originated in the early republican - No kings  Consulship- Two consults (military generals)o In charge of all the important things and call for a meeting of a senate, war, commander of armies o Share powero Annually elected, equal power o Both patricians and plebeians - Dictatorshipo Six months post in military emergencies - Senate o Members from the leading families o To sanction or veto resolutions passed by the assembly o Conservative in native o Senate could sanction or veto a law passed by assembly - Cincinnatus o Great commander in Rome and great farmer o Destroyed enemies and abandoned and resigned position as commander and came back to farm Early Republic - Magistracy o Dictator (temporary)o Consuls o Praetors: Junior council o Aediles: financial taskso Quaestors: criminal justice o Censors: to supervise senators – chosen once every five years rather than every year  Conduct census of population and assess wealth and put you into social classes for the assembly Monitored public morality – what books you shouldor should not read - Characteristics of the Magistracy o Anyone could veto the action of another one of equal or lesser rank o Higher rank enjoyed greater authority o Monarchy, aristocracy, and democracy o Early Republic  Centuriate Assembly - Elected all magistrate who exercised imperium- From military to civilian - Five classes and 193 voting units o Each class had different voting power  Tribal Assembly - Elected magistrates: magistrates who did not exercise imperium - Membership- adult male roman citizens- 35 voting


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