New version page

CSU HDFS 401 - Biological Foundations

This preview shows page 1 out of 3 pages.

View Full Document
View Full Document

End of preview. Want to read all 3 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a GradeBuddy member to access this document.

View Full Document
Unformatted text preview:

HDFS 401 1st Edition Lecture 4Outline of Last Lecture II. Pathway of Social DevelopmentA. Multifinality B. EquifinalityIII. Influences on Judging Social Behavior A. Child/Adult/ContextIV. Psychologist and Social Behavior V. Homework Discussed in ClassOutline of Current Lecture VI. Biological “Preparedness” for Social InteractionVII. Visual Preparation for Social InteractionVIII.Auditory Preparedness for Social Interaction Cat in the Hat StudyIX. Prime to be a Social PartnerX. Face-to-Face InteractionsXI. Neurological Bases a. Motor Cortex b. Visual Cortexc. Auditory Cortex d. Prefrontal CortexCurrent LectureBiological FoundationsBiological “Preparedness” for Social Interaction - The earlier we attach to the caregiver the better - We form biological rhythms to social rhythms (Ex: sleep/wake cycle)o Babies learn to adjust to parents social structure at night, the night is a time to be more calm and babies will pick up on this over time- Acquisition of biological regulatory skills – interaction synchrony- Development of biological rhythms that help babies deal with the time Visual Preparation for Social Interaction These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.- Babies are attracted to visual social stimuli – faces, eyes especially o Will gravitate toward a familiar faceo Like to see contrast – checkerboard pattern is popular for babies to look at, brightcolorsAuditory Preparedness for Social Interaction - Hearing sense is well developed before birth o Study: The Cat in the Hat – babies who listened to their mothers read Cat in the Hat in the womb proved to have a longer attention span when mothers would talk to them after they were born (will focus their gaze and eyes are open wider) - By 4 months – able to understand language o Helps to use “child directed speech” AKA baby talk. – “Hi Swe-e-et-eie” o Helps to develop language better and faster – hearing this slowly helps them to understand pronunciationo Speaking in high pitch helps them to tune in Prime to be a Social Partner - Infants prefer face –to-face play over other activities- Capable of regulating interactions with gaze (watching your face)- Model positive interactional styles o Still face experiment: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apzXGEbZht0o Mother practices “still face” and baby responds negatively because baby is used to the mother interacting and picking up on her positive social cues o Sometimes if too stimulating, infants turn away, cry, or distract themselves What do Babies Learn from Face-to-Face interactions? - Emotions – Ex: expressions (Happy/Sad)- Pragmatics- Ex: eye contacts- Body Language – Ex: Hand gestures- Responses – Ex: Response to communication, turn taking in speaking- Learn that adults respond to them - They can control other people’s behaviors (When I point, my dad will look)- Rules of Social Exchange – Ex: personal spaceNeurological Bases of Social Development/ Brain Development - Cerebrum – two connected hemispheres of the brain - Cerebral Cortex – (4-6) layers of tissue, 90% of neurons, responsible for moving, sensing, feeling, thinking, & talking- Rapid prenatal & infant growth o Newborn brain weighs ¼ of an adult brain o 2 year old brain weighs ¾ of adult brain Parts of the Brain - Parts of the brain develop at different timesMotor Cortex - Birth to 2 months – shift from reflexes to voluntary control of movement - 8 months- ability to crawl & search for hidden objects- 12 moths- walking, *social development – regulating interaction (pointing) - Baby sign language – useful tool in communication Visual Cortex - 3 months – look longer at face-like vs. non-face-like stimuli Auditory Cortex - 18 & 24 months – language development Prefrontal Cortex - 5 & 7 years – development of executive processes (attention, emotional regulation, and


View Full Document
Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view Biological Foundations and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view Biological Foundations and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?