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Purdue BIOL 11000 - Exam 1 Study Guide

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BIOL 11000 1st EditionExam # 1 Study Guide Lectures: 1 - 8This sample exam has 28 questions meant to represent some of the topics covered in the 1st exam and the kinds of questions on it. The correct answer is in bold. If you’d like to take the exam without seeing the answers, simply “select all” (Ctrl-A) and “unbold” (Ctrl-B) or their Mac equivalents.Warning, this is only a sample of the potential topics covered on the exam. There are topics covered in lecture that aren’t represented here, and they may be on the real exam. The real exam will have 33 questions, each worth 3 points, for 99 points. You’ll get 1 point for filling out the bubble sheet to make a total of 100 points. Good luck.1. Scientific hypothesesA. must be capable of being proven trueB. must be capable of being proven falseC. are tested only by experiments in a laboratoryD. A and CE. B and C2. Which of the following is true about scientific theories?A. they link many hypotheses into a more general modelB. they’re theories in the everyday sense of just an untested ideaC. they include the Atomic Theory of Matter and the Theory of Evolution by Natural SelectionD. A and CE. B and C3. The Cellular Theory explains which of the following?A. why some organisms are made of one cell and some are made of many cellsB. where all cells (except the first ones) come fromC. how spontaneous generation (the formation of life from nonliving matter) happensD. the origins of the differences between living organismsE. where the first cells came from4. The Theory of Evolution by Natural SelectionA. explains how trilobites appeared and disappeared in the fossil recordB. states that natural selection by differential survival and reproduction is the mechanism of evolutionC. states that the characteristics that lead to fewer offspring will become more common in future generationsD. A and BE. B and C5. The diversity of lifeA. includes an estimated 8 million currently living speciesB. includes many species that are now extinctC. is limited to plants, animals, and fungiD. A and BE. B and C6. In the tree of life, the familiar plants and animalsA. are all located in the domain eucaryotaB. form a large fraction of the total tree of lifeC. are all located in the domain archaeaD. are more distantly related to each other than are the bacteria and archaeaE. none of the above7. The organism right before the first divergence between the various branches of the tree of lifeA. is called the first universal common ancestorB. is a common ancestor to all currently living organismsC. had characteristics shared with all currently living organismsD. A and BE. B and C8. Which one of the following is not true in a hierarchy of living and nonliving thingsA. atoms of made of interacting subatomic particlesB. organisms are made of interacting cellsC. the higher level interactions (cells, organisms, ecosystems) are the result of evolutionD. the lower level interactions (subatomic particles, atoms, molecules) are the result of evolutionE. the higher level interactions show special complexity, often called “emergent properties”9. Some characteristics of matterA. can be described by the equations F=ma and F=Gm1m2/r2B. include mass and volumeC. include inertia, the resistance to acceleration, and gravitational attractionD. all of the aboveE. none of the above10.The relationship between mass and energy implied by the Theory of Special RelativityA. includes all forms of energyB. is defined by the equation E = mc2C. states that small amounts of mass are equivalent to large amounts of energyD. states that matter and energy are two forms of the same underlying thingE. all of the above11. ProtonsA. are elementary particles (not made of anything smaller)B. are a member of the class of particles called leptonsC. are a member of the class of particles called hadronsD. A and BE. A and C12.ProtonsA. have twice as much mass as a neutronB. have roughly the same mass as a neutronC. have much less mass than a neutronD. have much more mass than a neutronE. none of the above13. ElectronsA. have a much larger mass than protonsB. are a member of the class of particles called leptonsC. are a member of the class of particles called hadronsD. A and BE. A and C14.Electrons, protons and neutronsA. are all subatomic particlesB. are all elementary particlesC. are all electrically charged particlesD. all have approximately the same massE. none of the above15.QuarksA. can have a charge of +2/3 and -1/3B. can be isolated as separate particlesC. are components of electronsD. are truly elementary particlesE. A and D16.LeptonsA. are truly elementary particlesB. are not elementary, they are made of quarksC. include electronsD. A and BE. A and C 17.The four fundamental forcesA. store energy as potential energyB. include both short and long-range forcesC. store energy as kinetic energyD. A and BE. B and C18.Quantum mechanics says thatA. interactions between matter and energy are quantizedB. interactions between matter and energy are continuousC. any number of electrons can occupy an orbitalD. there is 100% chance that an electron will be found within its orbital volumeE. none of the above19.I try to find out what’s inside a proton by putting more energy into it, but it doesn’t break up into the component quarks. Why?A. protons are not really made of quarksB. the weak nuclear force gets much stronger when you add energy to itC. the strong nuclear force gets stronger when you try to pull the quarks apart, like a rubber bandD. the attractive force of electromagnetism is still stronger than the energy put into the protonE. none of the above, the proton is really breaking up into the component quarks20.Different elementsA. have atoms with different numbers, but the same types of subatomic particlesB. have atoms with the same number, but different types of subatomic particlesC. have atoms with different numbers and different types of subatomic particlesD. have atoms with same numbers and same types of subatomic particlesE. none of the above21.If Avogadro’s number equals 6.02 x 1023, which of the following is true?A. one neutron would weigh 6.02 x 1023 gramsB. 6.02 x 1023 AMU (Daltons) equals 1 gramC. a mole of neutrons would weigh 6.02 x 1023 gramsD. a mole of carbon atoms (6 protons, 6 neutrons) would weigh 1 gramE. 6.02 x 1023 water molecules (molecular weight 18) would weigh 1 gram22.There are three natural isotopes of the element carbon. The carbon isotope of mass14 (14C)


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