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UNCG PSY 275 - Exam 1 Study Guide

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PSY 275Exam # 1 Study Guide Lectures: 1 -2 4-6Lecture 1 Defining Clinical Psychology: Chapter 1 and January 13th Lecture What is Clinical Psychology?- Branch of psychology ( the study of human behavior) that studies and treats individuals with psychological problems and disorders What kind of education and training do you need to become a clinical psychologist?- Must obtain a doctoral degree in clinical psychology. For those entering with a bachelors degree, training typically consists of at least 4 years of intensive full time coursework followed by a 1 year full time pre-doctoral internship after that most states require post-doctoral.What are the three training models of doctoral training in clinical psychology and how are they defined?- Scientist-Practitioner model (Boulder) training in clinical psychology should jointly emphasize both practice and research. - Practitioner-Scholar Model (Vail) less extensive training in research and more extensive training in the development of applied clinical skills. - The Clinical Scientist Model stressed the scientific side of clinical psychology more strongly than did the Boulder model. What are the differences between a PhD and a PsyD?-PhD is awarded with the Scientist-Practitioner and The clinical Scientist styles while the PsyD is awarder with the Practitioner- Scholar style. In general compared with PhD programs, PsyD programs tend to: - Place less emphasis on research - Accept and enroll more applicants - Be housed in free- standing independent ( or university affiliated) professional schools asopposed to departments of psychology in universities - Accept students with lower graduate record examination scores and undergraduate grade point averages - Offer significantly less funding to enrolled students in the form of graduate assistantships, fellowships, tuition remission and so on - Accept and enroll a higher percentage of students who have already earned a mater degree- Have lower rates of success placing their students in APA accredited predoctoral internships - Produce graduates who score lower on the national licensing exam (EPPP)- Graduate students in a briefer time period (About 1.5 years sooner) - Graduate students who purse practice related careers rather than academic of research related careers and - Have a least a slightly higher percentage of faculty members who subscribe to psychodynamic approaches, as opposed to cognitive-behavioral approaches What are the Vail and Boulder Models?- The Vail model is the Practitioner-Scholar model and the Boulder model is the Scientist-Practitioner modelWhat is a predoctoral internship?- All clinical psychology doctoral programs culminate in the predoctoral internship. Typically internships consists of a full year of supervised clinical experience in an applied setting – a psychiatric hospital, a veterans affairs medical center, a university counseling center, a community mental health center or a medical school. As imposed by the term predoctoral this internship year takes place before the PhD or the PsyD is awarded. What is a postdoctoral internship? How does it relate to licensure?- Beyond the predoctoral internship and the doctoral degree the follows most states require a postdoctoral internship for licensure as a psychologists. The postdoc typically last 1 to 2 years and it is essentially a step up from the predoctoral internship. What are some of the requirements for licensure?- Becoming licensed gives a professional the right to identify as a member of the profession to present oneself as psychologists. Becoming licensed also requires passing licensure exams – typically the EPPP and a state specific exam on laws and ethics. What is the EPPP?- The Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology , the EPPP is a standardized multiple choice exam on a broad range of psychology topics What are CEUs and why do psychologists complete them?- Once licensed, clinical psychologists in many states must accumulate contuning education units (CEUs) to renew the license from year to year. The purpose of requiring CEUs is to ensure that clinical psychologists stay up to date on development in the field. What are some common settings where psychologists work?- Private practices, the university psychology department , medical centers/ veterans administration, research universities and liberal arts colleges What kinds of professional activities do clinical psychologists engage in?- Psychotherapy most common activity of clinical psychologist, assessments how psychologists diagnose mental illness, teaching, supervision, research/writing, consultation and administration. What is the most common activity of clinical psychologists?- Psychotherapy What are the different schools of psychotherapy?Psychodynamic, humanistic/experiential, behavioral, cognitive, third wave behavioral How do clinical psychologists differ from counseling psychologists, licensed professional counselors, psychiatrists, social workers, and school psychologists?- Counseling psychologists is less likely to work with severely ill clients or work in medical centers , professional counselors work generally involves counseling with very little emphasis an psychological testing or conducting research, psychiatrist are allowed to prescribe medication and psychiatrist training emphasizes biology to such an extent that disorders are viewed first andforemost as physiological abnormalities of the brain, social workers have focused their work on the interaction between an individual and the components of society that may contribute to or alleviate the individuals problems , and school psychologists usually work in schools and enhance the intellectual, emotional , social and developmental lives of students Lecture 2 History of Clinical Psychology: Chapter 2 and January 15th LectureWhat did early civilizations believe was the cause of mental illness?- That they were possessed by evil spirits What is trephination?- When somebody cut a hole in the skull of a person What group of people came up with the theory of hysteria? What is hysteria?- Hippocrates, hysteria or wondering uterus is an early form of mental illness that is diagnosed in women.Who is Hippocrates?- Is the founding father of medicineWhat are asylums? When were they popular?- Asylums is a place where they placed the mentally ill so they could not be apart of the society they were popular from the renaissance through the 18th century Who are some of the “early


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