New version page

TAMU ARCH 250 - Developed English Architecture

Type: Lecture Note
Pages: 4

This preview shows page 1 out of 4 pages.

View Full Document
View Full Document

End of preview. Want to read all 4 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a GradeBuddy member to access this document.

View Full Document
Unformatted text preview:

Arch 250 1st Edition Lecture 6 Outline of Last Lecture I. Notre Dame at ParisII. Sainte-ChapelleIII. Amiens CathedralIV. Building the Great CathedralsOutline of Current lecture I. Lincoln Cathedrala. Angel ChoirII. Ely Cathedrala. Lady Chapelb. Crossing TowerIII. Westminster HallIV. Westminster AbbeyV. King’s College Chapel Lincoln Cathedral // England // 1192-1280Earlier phases date to 11th and 12th centuries; the current church was built after the earlier structure collapsedPlan shows similar characteristics as Salisbury (2 transepts, 2 choirs)Long strips of blind arcadesPossibly used for defense; Rounded portals juxtapose old and new, signifies age and local importanceInterior vaults demonstrate a new approach to the rib vault by adding a ridge rib along the central fold of the vaultsSupplementary cross ribs called tiercerons “Crazy vault” ribs that aren’t structurally crucialImportant development in how builders saw vaults as a “shell structure” where the ribsTransverse rib: goes straight across the naveDiagonal Rib: meet with other ribs at angles in the centerTierceron: doesn’t go directly across to form part of a VForm a decorative patternThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.Liberates vaults from the archesTurns out to be pretty popularAngel Choir:Decorated Period traceryHuge stained glass windowBlind arches beneathDarker stone part of decorationNamed because angel relief sculptures on walls between arches of galleryEly Cathedral // England // 1081-133611th c. Norman Romanesque construction of west façade, nave, and transept14th c. Gothic Construction1322 – 1336 Crossing tower, lantern1335 – 1340 Choir vaultsca. 1321 Lady ChapelVery long but now double transept or double choirTwo chapels and very deep portal on W. endVery steeply pitched roof over naveLady chapel on NE Side:Flying buttressesThird English Style: PerpendicularRibs are even smaller, fanning out from wall corbelsRib vault  Crazy Vault  Perpendicular Fan VaultLierne: a decorative nonstructural supplementary rib added to Gothic vaultingOgee Arches: double curve ~Crossing Tower with LanternNorman Predecessor too heavy, collapsed in 1322Foundations not strong enough for masonry vaultConstruction of wooden lantern (tower with windows rising above roofline)William Hurley, King’s CarpenterSupported on octagonal base of oak posts 63’ long, 40” thick and 32” wideSupported on hammer beams tied to the masonry crossing piers, diameter of 69’Perp. Fan vaults for transition to octagonal lantern, mask timber framingStill vividly paintedSelf sufficient, timber much lighter than stone  less pressure on construction belowOriginal timbersHammer beam truss uses short cantilevers extending from the wall to narrow the span, thus allowing for the use of shorter timbers, related to corbellingWestminster Hall // England // 1394 – 1402Built by Henry Yevele290’ long, 68’ wide, ceiling height 92’ in centerSpaced used for meetingsHammer beam trussesCorbel  knee brace  hammer beam  hammer post  arch brace  tie beamWestminster Abbey // London, England // 1245 – 1519Royal abbey of Saint PeterKing’s burial-churchPlace of coronationShrine of St. Edward the ConfessorReliquary for sacred treasures11th c. Romanesque church (Norman influence)1245 – 1272 Construction of Gothic church begins under Henry III, modeled on French Gothic1376 – 1506 Completion of nave begins under Henry Yevele1509 – 1519 Construction of Lady Chapel by Henry VII1734 – 45 West gable and towers built by NicholasCompeting with France by using French characteristicsTall proportionsPointed archesRibbed vaultingFlying buttressesRose windowsTracery used in windowsApse with radiating chapelsPolygonal chancelPerpendicular fan vaults articulated by gold gilded transverse ribs and ridgeShows English heritageLady chapel:Perpendicular style pendant vault, almost like stalactitesKing’s College Chapel // Cambridge, England // 1446 – 1515Perpendicular style: emphasis on verticality, thin panels of tracery, continuous linesPlan: simple elongated rectangleNot as big as cathedrals  no flying buttresses, just regularMost of the walls are windowsFan vaultsStudents on one side, townspeople on the otherCOLLEGE CHAPEL“King’s college” = royal


View Full Document
Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view Developed English Architecture and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view Developed English Architecture and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?