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SC DANC 101 - Weeks Two and Three Notes

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DANCE APPRECIATION – LECTURE OUTLINE – WEEKS TWO AND THREEMedieval Period – Middle Ages- 400 to 1400 A.D.- The Bubonic Plague – The Black Plague- Danse Macabre – “The Dance of Death”- Fall of the Roman Empire- Early Christian Church Dictated Artistic Endeavors- Dance, because it was physical and pleasurable, was frowned upon and even banned unless created specifically for the purpose of glorifying the Church- Symbols of death and dying abound – skulls, skeletons, black masks and black draping- Dance and other artistic pursuits flourished during this time in the Islamic cultures- Aesthetic elements flourish in the East – Baghdad - cultural center of IslamRenaissance Period- 1400 to 1700 A.D.- A rebirth – renewed interest in the arts and culture of the Ancient World- The long, rich history of ballet dates back to the fifteenth century- Catherine de Medici (1519-1589)- member of the royal house of Italy; called the mother of ballet and dance; set the world into an acceptance of dance - Dance Masters from Italy to France (1559)- Court of Henri, Duc d’ Orleans- Court Ballets- Dazzling spectacles of ballroom and ballet often consisted of simple floor patternsand poses that revolved around the king- Always a bow or reverence to the king- Balthasar de Beaujoyeulx (c.1535-1587)- Italian dancing master that Catherine brought to France to bring dance and class to the French court; put men and women in dance classes - Ballet de Polonais (1573)- ballet; political dance; dance to honor and inclusive of all the 16 provinces - Comique de la Reine (1581)- ballet; entertainment of the ruling house; Catherine talked the king into letting her spend 3 million 600 thousand gold French franks; first court ballet; giant drunken party - Pierre Beauchamp (1631-1705)- established first five positions and turnout; - Dance Master, first Ballet Master of the Royal Academy of Damce- Created the five ballet positions used today, developed the technique of using the turned-out leg as well as began a system of dance notation- Development of turn-out and increased technical proficiency- Creation of the proscenium stage in late 16th Century brought a more serious, theatrical and pre-professional quality to the ballet- Folk Dance for Commoners and Working Class Citizens- Minuet, Pavan, Galliard, Volta- Louis XIV (1638-1715)-star of ballet; established the first school of dance- Louis XIV was King of France from 1643-1715 and commissioned many ballets in which he himself performed- The Sun King – Patterned after Apollo, The Sun God- The Palace at Versailles- Dance became a weapon of state – a way to control the aristocracy- Courtiers must be as well versed in the art of dance as they are in the military arts- Desired Outcomes: Courtly Manners – Memory of Sequence of Steps – Awareness of time and space- The Royal Academy of Dance – The Academy Royale de la Danse (1661)- Jean Baptiste Lully (1632-1687)- developed the score for the ballets - Dancer and Composer, Director of the Royal Academy of Music and Dance- Royal Academy of Music and Dance (1672)- John Georges Noverre (1727-1810)- wrote the first book; wanted ballet to be more like theatre; story ballets like the nutcracker o Letters on Dancing and Ballet- Noverre brings ballet d’action to the forefront of ballet choreography- Ballet d’action emphasizes plot and adds greater authenticity and expressiveness- Pantomime featured in ballets- Paris Opera (Paris Opera Ballet)Text: Chapter One and Chapter Five Video: Dance at Court and Lord of the


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