New version page

UH TELS 3345 - chapter14

This preview shows page 1-2-3 out of 8 pages.

View Full Document
View Full Document

End of preview. Want to read all 8 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a GradeBuddy member to access this document.

View Full Document
Unformatted text preview:

1PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie CookPowerPoint Presentation by Charlie CookThe University of West AlabamaThe University of West AlabamaManaging Human ResourcesManaging Human ResourcesBohlander Bohlander •• SnellSnell1414ththeditionedition© 2007 Thomson/South© 2007 Thomson/South--Western.Western.All rights reserved.All rights reserved.The Dynamics ofThe Dynamics ofLabor RelationsLabor Relations© 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 14–2ObjectivesAfter studying this chapter, you should be able to:1. Identify and explain the principal federal laws that provide the framework for labor relations.2. Explain the reasons employees join unions.3. Describe the process by which unions organize employees and gain recognition as their bargaining agent.4. Discuss the bargaining process and the bargaining goals and strategies of a union and an employer.5. Differentiate the forms of bargaining power that a union and an employer may utilize to enforce their bargaining demands.© 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 14–3Objectives (cont’d)After studying this chapter, you should be able to:6. Describe a typical union grievance procedure and explain the basis for arbitration awards.7. Discuss some of the contemporary challenges to labor organizations.© 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 14–4Major Labor Laws• Railway Labor Act (RLA) of 1926• Norris LaGuardia Act (Anti-Injunction Act) • Wagner Act (National labor Relations Act) of 1935• Taft-Harley Act (Labor-Management Relations Act) of 1947• Landrum-Griffin Act (Labor-Management Disclosure Act) of 1959© 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 14–5Government Regulation of Labor Relations• The Railway Labor Act (RLA) of 1926 Purpose of the act is to avoid service interruptions resulting from disputes between railroads and their operating unions. National Mediation Board National Railway Adjustment Board• The Norris-LaGuardia Act of 1932 Restricts the ability of employers to obtain an injunction against unions for their lawful activities.© 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 14–6Government Regulation of Labor Relations• The Wagner Act (National Labor Relations Act) of 1935 Protects employee rights to organize and bargain collectively through representatives of their choice. Created the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) to govern labor relations in the United States. Holds secret ballot union representation elections. Prevents and remedies unfair labor practices.2© 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 14–7Wagner (NLRA) Act• Section 7 of the Act guarantees these rights: To self-organization, to form, join, or assist labor organizations, to bargain collectively through freely chosen representatives. To engage in concerted activities, for the purpose of collective bargaining or other mutual aid or protection.  To refrain from any or all of such activities except to the extent that such right may be affected by an agreement requiring membership in a labor organization as a condition of employment.© 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 14–8Unfair Labor Practices (ULPs)• Section 8 of the Wagner Act outlawed employer practices that deny employees their rights and benefits: Interference with Section 7 rights Domination of a union (company union) Discrimination against union members Arbitrary discharge of union members Refusal to bargain with the union© 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 14–9Amendments to the Wagner Act• The Taft-Hartley Act (The Labor-Management Relations Act) of 1947 Balances the rights and duties of labor and management in the collective bargaining arena by defining unfair union practices.• The Landrum-Griffin Act (Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act) of 1959 Safeguards union member rights and prevents racketeering and other unscrupulous practices by employers and union officers.© 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 14–10Unfair Union Practices (Taft-Hartley Act)Interfering with Section 7 rights of employeesInterfering with representation electionsInfluencing employers to discriminate with regard to union membershipRefusal to bargain collectively with employerInterference with certified employee representative’s relationship with employerAssessment of excessive initiation fees and dues on bargaining unit members“Featherbedding”© 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 14–11Labor Relations Process1. Workers desire collective representation2. Union begins its organizing campaign3. Collective negotiations lead to a contract4. The contract is administered© 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 14–12Why Employees Unionize• As a result of economic needs (wages and benefits)• Dissatisfaction with managerial practices• To fulfill social and status needs.• Unionism is viewed as a way to achieve results they cannot achieve acting individually• To comply with union-shop provisions of the labor agreement in effect where they work3© 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 14–13Figure 14Figure 14––1 1 The Labor Relations ProcessThe Labor Relations Process© 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 14–14OrganizingCampaignsUnion/Employee ContactUnion/Employee ContactInitial Organizational Initial Organizational MeetingMeetingFormation of InFormation of In--House House CommitteeCommitteeElection Petition and Voting Election Petition and Voting PreparationPreparationContract NegotiationsContract NegotiationsSteps in the Steps in the OrganizingOrganizingProcessProcess© 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 14–15Highlights in HRM 2 United Food and Commercial Workers International Union Authorization Card© 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 14–16Aggressive Organizing Tactics• Political Involvement• Union Salting• Organizer Training• Corporate Campaigns• Information TechnologyUnion NOW!!© 2007 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 14–17Employer Tactics Opposing Unionization• Stressing favorable employer-employee relationship experienced without a union.• Emphasize current advantages in wages, benefits, or working conditions the employees may enjoy• Emphasize unfavorable aspects of unionism: strikes, union dues, abuses of legal rights• Use statistics to show that unions commit


View Full Document
Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view chapter14 and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view chapter14 and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?