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MU PHY 182 - Ideal Gases

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PHY 182 1st Edition Lecture 2 Outline of Last Lecture I.Understanding PressureII. The three states of matterIII. Atoms and MolesIV. Temperature and Phase ChangesOutline of Current Lecture I. Definition of an Ideal GasII. Measuring Temperature & Introduction to ThermodynamicsIII. Applying the Ideal Gas LawCurrent LectureDefinition of an Ideal Gas- When doing calculations with gases, we use a simplified model of gases in which its atoms do not interact. A gas made up of non-interacting atoms is known as an ideal gas. This model works well if two conditions are met: the density is low, and the temperatureis well above the condensation point.- To perform calculations involving ideal gases, we will use an equation known as the idealgas law: PV=nRT, P is pressure in Pascal, V is volume in m^3, n is the number of moles, R is the universal gas constant (8.31 J/mol*K), T is temperature in KelvinMeasuring Temperature & Introduction to Thermodynamics- Possible ways to construct a temperature scale include: liquid in a container (measure volume change), gas in a sealed container (measure pressure change), or the resistance of a wire- For a thermometer to measure temperature, it must be in direct contact with the body. As a result of this contact, the two will reach a state of thermal equilibrium. (So you're actually finding out the temperature of the thermometer, not the body.)- Zeroth law of Thermodynamics: If object C is in thermal equilibrium with objects A and B, then A and B are in thermal equilibrium with each other.Applying the Ideal Gas LawThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.- The Ideal Gas Law is a relationship between state variables that characterizes a gas that is in thermal equilibrium.- In problems, we will deal mostly with gases in sealed containers and thus the value of "n" (number of moles) will not change.- Example of an Ideal Gas Problem:What is the volume of one mole of gas at STP (STP means standard temperature and pressure, 101325Pa and 273.15K)? Using the equation PV=nRT, we find that 1 mole of gas at STP has a volume of 22.4


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