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POLS 021 1st Edition Lecture 4 Outline of Last Lecture I. English-American Colonies in the 1700si. French and Indian Warii. Religious and Ethnic Migrationsiii. English Taxation ConsequencesII. After Effects of the American Revolution i. The Declaration of Independenceii. Articles of Confederation and Shay’s Rebellioniii. The Constitutional Convention and the Constitution of 1787iv. The Federalist Papersv. The Great Compromisevi. The Bill of RightsOutline of Current Lecture I. The Constitution and the Bill of Rightsa. Separation of Powersb. Original Amendments II. The Current Political Systema. Congress and House of Representativesb. Presidential Election and Impeachmentc. Vice-Presidentd. Amendments to suffragee. JurisdictionCurrent Lecture:The Constitution of 1787:- Justifies a Separation of Powers (to prevent tyranny and too much power in too few hands)- Distressed the election and popular vote because the founding fathers distrusted democracy. They did not trust the power and therefore limited public power in the Constitution. These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.The Bill of Rights (1791):Created because of the insufficient protection of individuals – the purpose of the Bill of Rights is to Protect individual freedoms.Summaries of Constitutional Amendments:Amendment 1: Freedom of Religion, Speech, Press, Petition, Right to assemble, etc. Amendment 2: Right to Bear Arms (Militia) Amendment 3: No forced quartering of soldiers in civilian’s residenciesAmendment 4: Security—No unreasonable searches and seizures without a warrant issued by proper causeAmendment 5: Right to a Grand Jury; cannot be tried for the same crime twiceAmendment 6: Right to a speedy public trial, right to be informed of accusations made against them and to be confronted with/by witnessesAmendment 7: Right of trial by juryAmendment 8: Excessive bail shall not be required, nor fines, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflictedAmendments 9 and 10: Used to challenge federal law and regulationAmendment 11 and 12: Cannot sue a state that you do not live inCurrent Political System:Congress: 100 Senators and 435 State Representatives. House of Representatives: Every state has one vote regardless of size.To Win the Presidency: 270 Electoral Votes The Impeachment Process:To remove the President of the United States:Step 1: The House of Representatives can impeach the president with a ½ majority voteStep 2: To convict the president and officially remove him from office, the Senate must pass a 2/3-majority vote. Only 2 Presidents have ever been “Impeached”: Bill Clinton and Andrew JohnsonPresident Nixon resigned before the impeachment voteThe Senate and the House of Representatives can remove their own members with a 2/3--majority vote.Vice-President:Today, The president picks the vice-president. It did not always used to be this way: vice-president used to be the person who came second in the presidential race, but this raised all kinds of thorny issues (whether president could trust formal rival, or sore loser using vice-president’s office to launch an uprising). In 1804, the state’s ratified the 12th amendment, which gave the Electoral College the power to pick a president and a vice-president. Franklin D. Roosevelt changed this in 1940 by threatening not to run for reelection if he was not able to have control of who his VP would be. Since then, no convention has ever challenged the nominee’s pick for a running mate (except in 1956, when Adlai Stevenson let the Democratic delegates decide). The VP pick is now left to one man, and one man alone. Amendments to WHO can VOTE:The 18th Amendment: Black men to voteThe 19th Amendment: Women to vote (Suffrage) The 26th Amendment: 18-20 year olds to vote Jurisdiction:For Treaties to be passed: President approval and Senate (2/3 majority)Voting Qualifications: State Legislatures, House of Representatives, and the SenateAppointments to High Office: President and the SenateDomestic Legislation: House of Representatives, Senate, President, and CourtsAdmission of New States: House, SenateConstitutional Amendments: House (2/3 majority), Senate (2/3 majority) and State legislatures or conventions (3/4


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