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UNC-Chapel Hill AMST 384 - Fredrick Douglas

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AMST 384 1st Edition Lecture 12Outline of Last Lecture II. Thomas JeffersonIII. MonticelloIV. Video NotesOutline of Current Lecture V. Obama’ ProclamationVI. History of African AmericansVII. Nat Turner Revolt VIII. Fredrick DouglasIX. “Heroic Slave”Lecture: President Obama’s Proclamation for African American History Month- Shows his political agenda to confront the issues of race- Hope of future because of our history - Our country is at its best when everyone is treated fairly and has chance to build their own futureHistory of African Americans in America- Crispus Attucks-first Martyr to Libertyo First African American killed in Boston Massacre- National Liberty Memorialo Monument in D.C. being built to honor slaves and free blacks who fought in the Revolution o Material Memory to remind everyone that blacks were there to fight for revolution - Revision of US History after 1960so The black story was suppressed, now want to make their story apart of the dominant storyo Malcolm X, MLK, Fredrick Douglas, Booker T. Washington, Sojourner Truth All important, now all on U.S. stamps Fredrick Douglas’ “Heroic Slave”-fictional story about black slaves- Took ship to Nassau in Bahamas and courts refused to consider blacks on board property- Slave owners sued to get claims and it took 15 years but money was finally returnedThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.- Successful revoltNat Turner Revolt (1831)- Killed many white families after his religious vision- Largest land revolt leading to enormous fears of whites bc concerned if he was conspiring with other black groups - After this, educational projects ended because whites scared that reading/writing would help blacks revoltToussaint L’Ouverture, Haitian Revolution (1807)- Liberty seeking patriot that overthrew English control in Haiti and set up a black republic- Was a fear of US southerners, fear of rebellion led to lots of violence against and coercion of black people Sojourner Truth- Slave in New York who ran away in 1826- Spokesperson for slaves and womenFredrick Douglas- What to the Slave in the Fourth of July?o Points out hypocrisy of nation and crimes against GodBooker T. Washington- Black intellectual in 19th century - Surname of Washington was 160,000 people in 2000o Because how do you write your name in the history of the American story? No better way then remember Booker and George WashingtonMalcolm X- Original name was Malcolm Little but changed it to X because it represents the lack of an Africanlast name- He was assassinated in 1965- “give us either the ballot or the bullet”o leader of blacks“Heroic Slave” by Fredrick Douglas- Abolitionist volume called Autographs for Freedom and asked to write in this novelo the Rochester Ladies Anti-Slavery invited Douglas- Willing to trash constitution that says we can hold slaves as property- Fighting for black rights and freedom- Uses the bible as sight of sacred and authoritative memory - Storyo Douglas introduces us to Virginia Madison Washington was a leader in anti-slavery movement- However, never gets credit because he was a black patriot- Distortions of memory because of white centered stories- Douglas trying to show that Madison was helpful in rebellion against slavery- In reality, was an illiterate cook. Fictional distortion in Douglas’s retelling of the storyo Little history found on real life Madison Washington because no one preserved his history o Hence, reason he fictionalized character Patrick Henry of Virginia- “give me liberty or give me death”o Four Parts of Story Part 1: Sunday, spring 1835, woods in Virginia- Madison whipped because didn’t come home on timeo Madison’s soliloquy, Listwell’s conversion- Mr. Listwell is a Northern and hears Madison’s very eloquent pleado Listwell so moved by “give me liverty or give me death” that he is converted to become an abolitionist Part 2: winter 1840, Listwell home in Ohio- Madison shows up at his house and given a bed, first one in his lifeo Listwell says he will remember that encounter and says that Madison’s face/reaction was always remembered in his mind “From that hour, your face seemed to be daguerreotyped on my memory”- Madison escaped his home in Virginia, found the North Star to guide himand travelled though the woods for 4 years- Morality of stealing and cooking food, narrow escape in treetop and gives him a dollar to a black man to get him some food (black man beaten), passage to Canadao Here Madison becomes most religious - Ends part 2 in Canadao “Madison is out of the woods, I nestle in the mane of the British lion, protected by his mighty paw of the American eagle” made it to Britian control (irony because British became liberty)  Wants to get liberty for his family and wife, goes back toget them but wife is killed Recaptured Part 3: Begins in dilapidated tavern between Petersburg and Richmond in 1841 (taverns are a lower status housing, decaying, lower class whites)- Wilkes, encounter with Madison Washington in slave gang to be sold South to New Orleanso Is it ok to steal? He thinks yes he can take the chicken if it is keeping him aliveo Common morals are challenged and seen as just- Listwell shows up and gives him three strong fileso Eavesdropping Listening to people in the inn talking about him and if hewas a rich slave owner Part 4: some months later, Jack Williams and Tom Grant at the Marin Coffeehouse in Richmond- Conversion of Tom Grant because moved by Washington so not going to move on slave ships anymore- Give an account of the mutiny- Storm and delivery- Appraisal of Madison Washington  What degree of Douglas’ fiction convert the real public to convert? Further support of the anti-slavery movement - Madison Washington says “I am not a murderer, I am fighting for liberty. If I am a murderer so are they.” o Madison justified the white murderers by saying he is doing the same thing as the white revolutioners were doing in the RevolutionReal life incidents that were incorporated in Douglas’ Story: USEABLE PASTCreole “Incident” and Case Real incident Creole transporting 135 slaves between Hamptom and Virginia and New Orleans 19 male slaves only 1 white person was killed o Madison says that he restrained from violence because his mission


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