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MUSIC 0311 1st Edition Lecture 7 Outline of Last Lecture I. ChinaII. QinIII. Chinese with LanguageIV. Qin TablatureV. Tin and the LiteratVI. The Value and Functon of MusicVII. Music and Confucianism (shi yin and chi yue)Outline of Current Lecture I. TaikoII. Matsuri-bayashi (“festval music”)III. Matsuri (“festval”)IV. ObonV. Bon odori and bon daikoVI. Contemporary Taiko PerformanceCurrent LectureTaikoTaiko is a family of drums. It means “fat drum”. It is defined as a drum that is hit with a stck and there are many different types of taiko. Taiko is found in every single musical element of Japan, but it is primarily used for festval music. There are largely accompaniment instruments in taiko performances. Taiko is believed to be very spiritual.Matsuri-bayashi (“festval music”)Matsuri-bayashi means festval music. This is not the name of one partcular type of music, but a genre of music. Festvals are typically Buddhist or Shinto. Shinto is not necessarily a religion but a belief system in Japan. These festvals are ted to the general lives of the people of Japan. Matsuri-bayashi is the music that accompanies the processions during festvals. The music changes in accordance to what’s happening at the tme. The music tends to be made up of These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.some sort of drum, some sort of hand percussion instrument, and some sort of wind instrument. People can hear the music before they can even see the procession. At certain spots, there are booths with a Matsuri-bayashi ensemble performing. This music is amateur music and not professional. This music is also very repettve.Matsuri (“festval”)Matsuri means festval. During Shinto festvals, there is a procession of a portable shrine. The festvals are primarily Shinto festvals.ObonObon is a Buddhist festval that occurs in late summer. It celebrates the return of their ancestorsand there is food, dancing, drinking, music and drums at these festvals.Bon odori and bon daikoBon odori is the dancing that occurs at Obon.Bon daiko is the drumming that accompanies this dancing.Contemporary Taiko PerformanceContemporary Taiko performance is made up of taiko ensembles or soloists. The main focus in this performance is taiko. This type of performance started emerging in Japan in the 1950’s and came to the United States in the late 1960’s. One contemporary taiko performance piece is called “Jack Bazaar” that we watched in class. These performances are meant to entertain. These performances also use arrangements of festval drumming styles. One piece that uses festval drumming styles is called “Miyake”. This piece is repettve and what you would find in a festval


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