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UA HIST 150C3 - The Age of Jim Crow

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HIST 150C3 1st Edition Lecture 5The Age of Jim CrowPolitical Disfranchisement-taking away the right of black American votesMississippi Plan 1890-1st state to promote political disfranchisement because they have a large black republican electoratePoll Tax-had to pay a poll tax in order to vote-$2-used to disfranchise black votersLiteracy Tests-oral tests, subjective-68 questions, asked everything from voting to piracy-used to disfranchise black votersGrandfather Clause-1898, stated that any man whose grandfather was eligible to vote on January 1st,1867 was now eligible to voteWhite primary-3rd tactic throughout the south-1st adopted in Texas in 1896, and by 1915 its spread all over the south-gave major political parties the right to decide who was eligible to vote in a primary electionThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.The Strange Career of Jim CrowBoston, 1841-law makers designated a section of railroad cars for black people-called this section the Jim Crow section-popular figure who had been created by Thomas RiceThomas “Daddy” Rice-began imitating and performing as a black person-By 1840’s, this was one of the most popular forms of entertainment in the U.S.-pretended to sing and dance like salvesJump Jim Crow-Thomas Rice’s routine Separate Car Law, Louisiana, 1890-stated that black people could only sit in the back section of railroad cars Creoles of color-one of the first groups to protest the Separate Car Law-mixed group of people (French and African Americans)-owned property-didn’t see themselves as slaves-majority lived in New Orleans-argue that Jim Crow laws violet 14th amendment Homer Plessy-arrested for violating laws in LouisianaJudge John H. Ferguson: Separate but not equal-Judge John H Ferguson argued that New Orleans had the right to construct separate butequal accommodations for blacksPlessy v Ferguson, 1896-supreme court case-Plessy’s lawyer argues that there is no law in the U.S. or state of Louisiana defining the limits of race-Argues that race is a social construction.One-drop rule-Homer Plessy had more European ancestry than African, but based on Supreme Court ruling, individuals would say that even if you have one drop of African ancestry you’d be classified as


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