New version page

UT UGS 303 - The Chorus, Conflicts, and Structure of Antigone

This preview shows page 1 out of 3 pages.

View Full Document
View Full Document

End of preview. Want to read all 3 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a GradeBuddy member to access this document.

View Full Document
Unformatted text preview:

UGS 303 1st Edition Lecture 6Outline of Last LectureI. Do we ever need a tyrant?II. How bad are tyrants?III. How would leadership best make a tyrant more effective?Outline of Current LectureI. The chorusII. ConflictsIII. The structureIV. QuestionsCurrent LectureI. The chorus is very important in Greek plays. Audiences would come to see thechorus as much as the show itself.A. The chorus typically danced and sang to the accompaniment of flutes (similar to clarinets) and drums.B. The chorus was composed of 12-15 young men of all different social classes who lived and trained together for months.C. All plays were performed in the theater of Dionysus, and they were competing with each other. The play that won usually succeeded because of the quality of its chorus.D. The chorus basically functions as an audience. They watch the play, andthen set an example for how the real audience should react.1. Similar to cheerleaders at football games — Woodruff calls the chorus “griefleaders.”II. Main conflicts in the play:A. Men v. women1. Like in the scene performed by students in the previous lectureB. Youth v. age1. Mainly the Creon v. Haemon debateC. Family v. society1. The fact that Antigone buries her brother even though society forbids itD. Earth v. skyIII. Structure of the playA. The first scene is the prologue.1. In this play, this is the Antigone v. Ismene scene.B. Odes separate the scenes from one another.These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.1. Scenes were called “episodes”: Epis = after; so episode = after ode.C. The Parados: meaning “victory”, this is the ode after the prologue.D. Stasimon I: the first ode after the Parados.1. In this case, it is the famous “ode to man.”2. This ode both celebrates innovation and bemoans the danger that it brings.3. Food for thought: why is this ode located where it is? Is its subject Creon or Antigone? Whose side is the playwright on?4. Stasimon I is followed by the Creon v. Antigone debate.E. The next ode is about the family, stating that “madness stalks” it.F. Stasimon III is about “destroyer love”: is Haemon just a crazy teenager?1. The ode seems to support this view, by interjecting an ode about how love makes men crazy right after the Creon v. Haemon debate.G. Stasimon IV: courage.1. The chorus tries to comfort Antigone by telling her that others have suffered too. H. Stasimon IV is follwed by the Creon v. Tiresias episode.1. Tiresias is an old blind prophet who can see the future. However, people rarely believe him (this is a common trope in Greek myths).2. Tiresias tells Creon that he has made a grave mistake by sentencing Antigone to death.I. Who really talked Creon into yielding?1. After Tiresias speaks, Creon is merely shaken. His mind has not yet changed.2. It is when the chorus speaks in support of Tiresias that Creon truly changes his mind.J. Stasimon V = the Kletic.1. A prayer to Dionysus: “god of many names… O leader in the dance of stars…”2. It is a joyful ode to the gods at a moment of crisis in the play.IV. QuestionsA. Who says “we are women, we do not fight with men”?1. IsmeneB. Who says “the city is our lifeboat; we have no friends at all unless we keep her sailing right side up”?1. CreonC. Are members of the cursed family capable of making decisions for themselves?1. 72% say yes2. 28% say noD. What makes Creon so stubborn?1. Fear - 31%2. Contempt - 16%3. The gods - 1%4. Principle - 51% E. Who said “both sides spoke well”?1. The chorus leadera) All chorus lines directly interacting with the play characters are said by the chorus leader.b) Question: is this line honest or a wishy-washy attempt toavoid making a decision? Many scholars think the latter, but Woodruff holds that the chorus is modeling how the audience should feel: that both sides are valid and understandable.F. Is Haemon out of his mind with love?1. Yes - 41%2. No - 59%G. Is it true that “one learns in old age to be wise?” Can a young person, like the chorus or students, learn to be wise by studying the events of tragedies such as


View Full Document
Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view The Chorus, Conflicts, and Structure of Antigone and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view The Chorus, Conflicts, and Structure of Antigone and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?