Mizzou LTC 1100 - Gender Roles (10 pages)

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Gender Roles



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Gender Roles

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Pages:
10
School:
University of Missouri
Course:
Ltc 1100 - Orientation
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Gender Roles 10 08 2014 DIVERSITY Issues Related to Gender College of Education University of Missouri Columbia Gender Role Development GENDER ROLES societal expectations of how we should act think and feel as men and woman Earliest thing you learn Gender Role Development Gender Schemas organizing the world in terms of female and male Gender Schemas Society directed o Male Socialization Family directed Biologically directed Sex role stereotyping rigid beliefs about characteristics behaviors associated with one sex Developmental Milestones By the age of two Children are aware of gender differences By the age of three Gender Schemas have begun to form Clear concept of what it means to be a boy or a girl can be in place by the time a child reaches Kindergarten Developmental Milestones Early Childhood Gender role stereotyping occurs Rigid gender schemas about games toys careers etc have developed Middle Childhood Sex appropriate behaviors are taught There is a cognitive organization of sex roles Developmental Milestones Adolescence Around the age of 11 or in the pre adolescent period we see a drop of confidence in some females Highly sensitive age Real Gender Differences Physical Activity Motor Skills differences overlap a lot Girls less well developed overall better fine motor skills before puberty Boys predisposed to be more active biological advantage in height and strength Cognitive Academic Abilities Differences are small gap is decreasing Similar on tests of general intelligence Perform equally well in math Girls better at some verbal tasks reading writing vocabulary higher grades in school Boys better at visual spatial tasks mathematical problem solving greater variability overall More than 2 3 of all students in special ed programs are male Motivation in Academic Activities Both more motivated to perform in gender stereotypical areas Girls more engaged more motivated to do well in school go to college Boys more willing to take academic challenges and risks less concerned about failure Sense of Self Self worth similar until puberty o consistent with stereotypes boys would rate themselves confident in math and girls in reading boys overestimate abilities girls underestimate Boys have higher expectations Boys have more confidence in ability to control the world Girls see themselves as competent in interpersonal relationships Interpersonal Behaviors Girls more likely to engage in relational aggression more intimate friendships more cooperative affiliative closer attention to emotions nonverbal cues Boys more physically aggressive larger playgroups more competitive Classroom Behavior Boys more likely to misbehave more participatory Girls less likely to volunteer answers more likely to lead in same sex groups than in mixed groups Career Aspirations Boys historically more ambitious but girls today are also ambitious Both boys girls tend toward stereotypical goals Origins of Gender Differences Biology o hormones o brain differences Parenting o expectations encouragement o toys other resources Peers o prefer stereotypical behavior Popular media o stereotypical models Self socialization o gender schema theory children construct their own beliefs Schools Contributions Majority of teachers praise girls for appearance boys praised on content of work Teachers have higher expectations for boys Boys more encouraged to take math science courses School Contributions con t Boys receive more attention African American girls receive the least amount of attention Females punished more promptly for aggressive behavior When girls cannot answer questions teachers give them the answer They let guys figure it out Underlying message you cant do it Creative behavior of males reward more Curriculum materials Women s Wages lower than men s even when education is the same five or more years of college 69 for every dollar earned by male colleagues with the same years of education Promoting Gender Equity Become self aware of your actions attitudes in the classroom Make certain you call on girls as much as boys Invite female and male role models not stereotypical Seek out books other materials that better represent women minorities Gender Identity Person s innate deeply felt psychological identification as male or female which may or may not correspond to the person s body or designated sex at birth Gender expression external characteristics and behaviors that are socially defined as either masculine or feminine Sexual Orientation individual s physical and or emotional attraction to the same and or opposite gender Heterosexual bisexual and homosexual are all sexual orientations A person s sexual orientation is distinct from a person s gender identity and expression LGBTQ Students 5 6 of American students are LGBT 2 5 2 7 million youth 75 bullied and feel unsafe 37 have been physically harassed assaulted 60 hear homophobic remarks 35 have heard the remarks from school staff teachers Risks for LGBTQ students Skipping school Dropping out academic failure Harassment from peers and adults Family rejection Homelessness Physical and sexual violence Depression suicide attempts What can educators do Be agents of change Promote acceptance Adopt implement anti bullying policies Encourage LGBTQ students to seek out support systems Learn about LGBTQ issues GLAD PRISM Rainbow alliance 10 08 2014 10 08 2014


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