Mizzou LTC 1100 - Gender Roles (10 pages)

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Gender Roles



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Gender Roles

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Pages:
10
School:
University of Missouri
Course:
Ltc 1100 - Orientation

Unformatted text preview:

Gender Roles 10 08 2014 DIVERSITY Issues Related to Gender College of Education University of Missouri Columbia Gender Role Development GENDER ROLES societal expectations of how we should act think and feel as men and woman Earliest thing you learn Gender Role Development Gender Schemas organizing the world in terms of female and male Gender Schemas Society directed o Male Socialization Family directed Biologically directed Sex role stereotyping rigid beliefs about characteristics behaviors associated with one sex Developmental Milestones By the age of two Children are aware of gender differences By the age of three Gender Schemas have begun to form Clear concept of what it means to be a boy or a girl can be in place by the time a child reaches Kindergarten Developmental Milestones Early Childhood Gender role stereotyping occurs Rigid gender schemas about games toys careers etc have developed Middle Childhood Sex appropriate behaviors are taught There is a cognitive organization of sex roles Developmental Milestones Adolescence Around the age of 11 or in the pre adolescent period we see a drop of confidence in some females Highly sensitive age Real Gender Differences Physical Activity Motor Skills differences overlap a lot Girls less well developed overall better fine motor skills before puberty Boys predisposed to be more active biological advantage in height and strength Cognitive Academic Abilities Differences are small gap is decreasing Similar on tests of general intelligence Perform equally well in math Girls better at some verbal tasks reading writing vocabulary higher grades in school Boys better at visual spatial tasks mathematical problem solving greater variability overall More than 2 3 of all students in special ed programs are male Motivation in Academic Activities Both more motivated to perform in gender stereotypical areas Girls more engaged more motivated to do well in school go to college Boys more willing to take academic challenges and risks less



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