UA PHL 292 - Exam 2 Study Guide (9 pages)

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Exam 2 Study Guide



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Exam 2 Study Guide

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Pages:
9
Type:
Study Guide
School:
University of Alabama
Course:
Phl 292 - Introduction to Ethics
Introduction to Ethics Documents

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PHL 292 1nd Edition Final Exam Study Guide The final exam will have two parts for a total of 100 points All potential questions will be given to you before the exam see below and a subset of these questions will appear on the exam You will have 75 minutes to complete the exam First four of the following nine short answers will be on the exam A few sentences to one paragraph answer should suffice Each question will be worth 10 points 1 What is a moral right What is a positive right What is a negative right Give an example of a negative right Briefly state how the notion of rights is used in an argument from a paper that we read Arthur Thomson Regan or Cohen Negative rights rights of noninterference natural rights from birth o Examples right to life right to religious freedom Positive rights rights of recipience contracts promises o Examples children under custody of biological parents are entitled to be fed clothed etc employees are entitled to a paycheck Arthur maintains that all humans beings have natural rights negative rights Arthur says that DNS have no positive rights of recipience to the income of wealthy individuals positive rights According to Arthur to require one to sacrifice his natural rights and his body parts is to show a lack of respect for persons 2 What moral principle does Singer rely on in his argument for the claim that we ought to sacrifice any wealth surplus to help prevent world poverty disease and starvation State the principle exactly What does Singer mean by wealth surplus Anytime anyone has a wealth surplus to his or her essential needs she ought to has a moral obligation to sacrifice that surplus to help prevent world poverty disease starvation etc Essential needs are those that are mandatory for the preservation of our lives and health Principle if it is in our power to prevent something bad from happening without thereby sacrificing anything of comparable moral importance we ought morally to do it This is called the greater moral evil



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