UW-Madison ATMOCN 100 - Lake Effect Storms (6 pages)

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Lake Effect Storms



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Lake Effect Storms

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A lecture about lake effect storms and what types there are.


Lecture number:
36
Pages:
6
Type:
Lecture Note
School:
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Course:
Atmocn 100 - Weather and Climate
Edition:
1
Documents in this Packet

Unformatted text preview:

Atm Ocn 100 1st Edition Lecture 36 Outline of Last Lecture I Announcements II Weather of the day III Some Review IV Troughs Cyclones V Summary For Cyclone East of Rockies VI Cyclones Forming Along Gulf and East Coasts Outline of Current Lecture II Reminders III Weather of the day IV Lake Effect Storms V Snow climatology highly influenced by lake effects VI Why Lake Effect VII Lake Effect Storm Types VIII Different Animations of Lake Effect Storm Types Current Lecture Reminders Friday we will have a review session for the final next week There is a homework due Friday with extra credit associated with that Weather of the day The relative humidity plot shows the tropical bubble The blue area is a big elevated bubble of the tropics going around the earth And on the edges of the bubble the magenta colors are the jet streams They are occurring because of the energy from the bubble Last year we saw the polar vortex with strong persistent cold that was over Alaska was then went over us This is an El Nino year and the pattern is different We started off with the ridge but then we warmed up quite a bit There is a Jetstream coming into Baja peninsula This is associated with frequent precipitation near the Southwest coast like San Diego We are getting low amplitude waves moving across Lecture 18 Lake Effect Storms To get a band winds need to be moving parallel to the long axis of the lake The band forms from the contrast of the cold land and the water which if it isn t frozen has to be at 32 degrees Fahrenheit or warmer The water may have a temperature contrast of 30 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit and that thermal contrast produces a land breeze front And the thing you get in the Great Lakes is a land breeze front from both sides Snow climatology highly influenced by lake effects You get short parallel bands that are more intense If you get a cut off low pressure system at low levels with winds moving around cyclonically it may lead to heavy snow If they are cyclonically moving from



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