UB BIO 205 - Final Exam Study Guide (34 pages)

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Final Exam Study Guide



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Final Exam Study Guide

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The first part of the final will emphasize information from chapters 29 and 31-33. The rest of the exam will cover past material from chapters 2-28. Only key points from these chapters have been repeated in this study guide.


Pages:
34
Type:
Study Guide
School:
University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
Course:
Bio 205 - Fund of Bio Chemistry
Fund of Bio Chemistry Documents

Unformatted text preview:

BIO 205 Final Exam Study Guide Part I Chemical Foundations of Biochemistry Chapter 2 Stereochemistry of Biomolecules Determining R S configurations depends on the order of the four different groups attached to the central chiral carbon based on molecular weight If the order of the groups proceeds in a clockwise rotation going from 1 to 2 to 3 with the 4 th priority group going in the back then the molecule has an R configuration Remember there must be 4 different groups in order for the molecule to be chiral The only molecule that has a known d or l rotation is glyceraldehyde pictured to the right The D L naming system is based on the fact that d glyceraldehyde is also D glyceraldehyde Carbohydrates are named using the D L system All biological sugars are D which can be determined by looking at the chiral carbon that is furthest from the carbonyl in both aldoses and ketoses If the hydroxyl group of the sugar is pointing to the right then the sugar is D The D L system is applied to the chiral carbon in the backbone of an amino acid All naturally occurring amino acids are L except for glycine because it is not chiral The basic structure of an amino acid is pictured to the right Chapter 3 Weak Acids and Bases The equilibrium constant for an acid dissociation is denoted as Ka A larger Ka means that the acid is more likely to dissociate whereas a smaller Ka means that the acid will not dissociate very much The formula for pKa is pKa log Ka An acid with a large Ka will have a small pKa Things to look for on a titration curve o When the line of the graph becomes horizontal the pH is equal to the pKa At this point there is 50 of the deprotonated form and 50 of the protonated form present in the container This region on the graph is also called the buffering zone because the horizontal slope implies that the pH changes slowly as more base is added to the acid o When the line of the graph becomes vertical an equivalence point has been reached At that point the container holds



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