UT Arlington BIOL BIOL 3427 - ch16lo (10 pages)

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ch16lo



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ch16lo

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Pages:
10
School:
University of Texas at Arlington
Course:
Biol Biol 3427 - Plant Science
Plant Science Documents

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Chapter 16 Plants Fungi and the Move onto Land Biology and Society Will the Blight End the Chestnut American chestnut trees Once dominated forests of the eastern United States Were prized for their Rapid growth Huge size Rot resistant wood Around 1900 an Asian fungus was accidentally introduced from China into North America and in just 25 years blight caused by the fungus killed virtually all adult American chestnut trees Fortunately this type of harmful interaction between plant and fungus is unusual Many plants and fungi benefit from each other s existence COLONIZING LAND Plants are terrestrial organisms that include forms that have returned to water such as water lilies Terrestrial Adaptations of Plants Structural Adaptations A plant is A multicellular eukaryote A photoautotroph making organic molecules by photosynthesis In terrestrial habitats the resources that a photosynthetic organism needs are found in two very different places Light and carbon dioxide are mainly available in the air Water and mineral nutrients are found mainly in the soil The complex bodies of plants are specialized to take advantage of these two environments by having Aerial leaf bearing organs called shoots Subterranean organs called roots Most plants have mycorrhizae symbiotic fungi associated with their roots in which the fungi Absorb water and essential minerals from the soil Provide these materials to the plant Are nourished by sugars produced by the plant Leaves are the main photosynthetic organs of most plants with Stomata for the exchange of carbon dioxide and oxygen with the atmosphere Vascular tissue for transporting vital materials A waxy cuticle surface that helps the plant retain water Vascular tissue in plants is also found in the Roots Shoots Two types of vascular tissue exist in plants Xylem transports water and minerals from roots to leaves Phloem distributes sugars from leaves to the roots and other nonphotosynthetic parts of the plant Reproductive Adaptations Plants



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