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UW-Madison NUTRSCI 132 - Breastfeeding

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NUTR SCI 132 Lecture 33 Outline of Last Lecture I. Pregnancya. Trimestersb. Nutrient Needsc. Special Casesd. ProblemsII. PhytonutrientsOutline of Current Lecture I. Breast feedinga. Benefitsb. Recommendationsc. Ratesd. Physiologye. Breastfeedingf. Nutritiong. Breastfeeding supportCurrent LectureI. Breast Feedinga. Guest Lectureri. [email protected] Benefitsi. For Mother’s Health1. After Birtha. Uterine contraction, decreased bleedingb. Hormonal response-calming, focus on babyc. Suppression of ovulation2. Longer terma. Weight loss (?)These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.b. Reduced risk breast and ovarian cancersc. Type 2 diabetesii. For Baby1. Nutrition for babya. Milk is species specifici. Human milk matches infant needs for nutrition and fluidsii. Composition changes to meet needs of growing infantiii. Well tolerated, easily digested (esp. protein)iv. High in lipidsv. Minerals bioavailable2. Immune factors in milk keep baby healthya. Disease Protectioni. Ear, lower respiratory, GIii. Asthma, dermatitis, eczemaiii. Reduced risk: SIDS, Obesity, Type I & II diabetes, childhood leukemia3. Other Benefitsa. Analgesiab. Bondingc. Formula and bottle costsd. Time (convenience)e. Illness costsf. Environmentc. Breastfeeding Recommendationsi. American Academy of Pediatrics: 6 months exclusive, continued to 1 year, longer as mutually desiredii. World Health Organization: 6 months exclusive, continued to 2 years, longer as mutually desiredd. Demographicsi. Who is most likely to breastfeed?ii. Least likely1. Low income or other factors?a. Youngerb. Less Educationc. More childrend. Unmarriede. Less job autonomyf. Not previously breastfediii. Barriers to breastfeeding1. Societal issuesa. Public Opinion pollsb. Laws specifically protecting right o breastfeed in public andprivatei. First federal legislation1. Space to express breast milk, not a bathroom (shielded from view, not subject to intrusion)2. Reasonable break time as needed (not required to be paid)2. Culture and Tradition of Breastfeedinga. “Mothering the mother”e. Formulai. Breast milk is “gold standard”ii. Formula = “modified cow’s milk”1. Protein, carbohydrate2. Fortified with nutrients, including iron, vitamin D3. Most now contain DHAiii. All nutrition needed for first 6 months, then solid foodiv. Types1. “Regular” = +iron, DHA2. Newborn3. Breastfeeding “supplement”4. Soy 5. Hypoallergenic6. Human milk fortifierf. Stages of Lactationi. Milk is not the same from beginning to endii. Lactogenesis I1. Last trimester, limited milk productiona. First 1-5 days2. Colostruma. Yellowiii. Lacatogenesis II1. 2-5 days postpartum, copious milk secretion2. “When milk comes in”iv. Lactogenesis IIIv. Hormones1. Prolactin2. Oxytocina. Baby needs to suck right to stimulate productiong. Milk Compositioni. Changes with baby’s ageii. Different than cow’s


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