Mizzou WGST 3570 - 19th Century Working Women (6 pages)

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19th Century Working Women



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19th Century Working Women

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Pages:
6
School:
University of Missouri
Course:
Wgst 3570 - European Women in the 19th Century
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19th Century Working Women 10 21 2014 Work Working Class Culture Male breadwinner Gender politis of th working class separating men and women 1780 1830 Inclusion of women 1840s Trade unions and exclusion of women Effect of work legislation in 1840s The Working Woman Women s work Working women suspect women Female criminality A woman that was working for 8 hours did not have time to take care of her children Women should be regarded as wife and mother Shaftesbury Jules Simon a working woman is no longer a woman Criminalize working class women Working was gendered but did not take women out of work force Pushed women into something that was a little more dangerous Women s work was not considered to be work Working women could not be considered to be women Working Class Structure 10 21 2014 New economy create working class identity class consciousness Working class men called themselves producers status determined by their wages as opposed to earning a house or property Since they earn wages they should have political rights Anchored rights as head of household Shift in definition of work in 1800 o Work identified by craft o Industrialization turned everyone into wage workers no matter your work o Cutters were considered as higher status than the weavers Cutting as a male job and sewing as a female Male Breadwinner 1820 s men and women defined their place in society based on their work Family is dependent on worker Basis for working men to advocate and go on strike to earn higher wages o They were just as worthy as higher class men because they had family to take care of Breadwinner is the working class equivalent of men being doers Working Class Politics Inclusion of women Actively sought to incorporate man and woman Family was based on the wages they brought in Working class political movements were in many towns o Women took up 1 3 of the movements 1819 their presence was major in Peterloo Massacre 1819 o Officers were called to open fire on workers o 100 women and girls were killed for being workers Trade Unions and Exclusion of women Chartist movement Fight for wages despite what they did for a living Called chartist because it advocated charter Emergence of female politics Women were equal to men as workers Women had right to participate in politics as workers but they were made to temper men women were workers but their main role was at home o The right to vote should only be given to men in that they can protect their families o 1843 Chartist movement paper said keep women at home to look after family Decrease pressure on working force If you decrease the labor market with women in it the wages will rise o When men were trying to get their wages they through women under the bus Effect of Work Legislation in 1840 s 1841 Factory Act o reduced women s work day to 12 hours o Mines Act excluded women and children from the mines o Limit where women can be seen in workforce o Also a moral thing Women are being seen with women gaining ideas from each other and being led astray Women s Work Legislators argued that women weren t free laborers They can go in and legislate work for women Women gave babies opium in order for the babies to sleep so the woman can feed the baby when it wakes up Women s work was considered invisible because it was women s work and did to need to have higher wages Women earns one half to one third of a man s wages Women s work isn t categorized as work Women working ruined their bodies Women were incompatible with machines Working women were labeled as bad women o o o o o Their breasts would shrivel and their physiology would change making them unwomanly o This was mostly for married women Wouldn t be able to raise her children in a good way or have children o Unmarried woman didn t have a family The Working Woman 10 21 2014 Suspect Woman Shift in criminality 19th century gender system did women a big favor o women were not capable of committing bad acts o 10 20 of criminals in courts were females 1850 60 s number of female crimes were on the rise o Creating a breed of criminal women that weren t natural women 80 of criminals were men o Men were more criminal o Needed good women to make good men Women were atavistic unevolved less likely to commit crime Women loss their womanly characteristics which would make them more capable of criminal acts Prostitutes o Women could not tolerate the pain of tattoos o If they could tolerate a tattoo that means they have a higher pain tolerance like a man Female Criminal Working class women were hanged o Infanticide abortion killing their husband Search of evidence If women are working then they will turn on which they love best things that define femininity Women are far more likely to be charged with murder Court cases were accepted were those where women killed their husbands Only see court cases that have to be ruled upon o If women killed a neighbor s husband could be seen as trying to protect her children Tended to use poison o If they didn t use poison they would be found guilty If used a manly thing like a gun they would be found guilty o If use poison can be seen as a crime of passion and can get off Doesn t work for men because a crime of passion means acted on emotion Men don t act on emotion so that considers them women More likely to kill again If killed husband out of love you would get lesser sentence Infanticide o Baby farming take in babies like a day care and then kill them


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