Mizzou WGST 3570 - Work and Home (4 pages)

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Work and Home



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Work and Home

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Pages:
4
School:
University of Missouri
Course:
Wgst 3570 - European Women in the 19th Century
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Work and Home 09 25 2014 Elizabeth running business and running her home life Pregnant while running her business Apprentices and family visitors Her husband Richard spent time outside of business Family business passed on to son John and his wife Once John and Candia had their first child they moved to the suburbs She had no contact with the business Elizabeth was first class of woman to work in the industry Two gender model demonstrated Prior to Industrialization 09 25 2014 Household Mode of Production Married heterosexual couple center of household economy All family members work to maintain family o Some work to make money sell things farming making clothes child care cooking Women s work experience varied o Sometimes at markets fields households Non wage work considered work o Production reproduction and consumption part of model At some point get dependent on wage labor Altered relationship between house and work market Only considered workers if you brought in wages o Male was primary producer Reorganization of work Capital is soley in wealth and money o Money becomes capital when it controls the economy Changed where and how people worked Pulled production out of the household Work is no longer task oriented it s time oriented o Money depends on how much time you put in o Not getting paid for goods produced Sex and age segregation Married women of child bearing age did not work Men and adult children children over 12 worked Certain industries hired women o Textile industry Fluctuated greatly More docile labor force 75 of textile force Women could not get a job in agriculture o Less than 10 of women worked in agriculture 1810 o In France almost 40 worked in agriculture Difference being French revolution Segregation in agriculture occurred still o Women were primarily in dairy did not go in the fields o Sweden improper for men to milk a cow o When it was mechanized it became men s work o Less than half of women s workers engaged in mill work o Women s numbers increase in homemakers o They were in the kitchen as well and servants o Expansion of domestic services that s where the work was o Work that was done in the household became women s work no matter the strength it required o Ability to work is contingent on mid civil status o Women working for wages was circumstantial Did it when they were young and unmarried Middle Class Ladies 09 25 2014 Connection to economy also erased Culture and values became dominant ones in this time period Earn trade commerce Middle Class Families who maintain at least one servant Able to maintain 150 pounds 12 750 to support one servant 450 pounds for 3 servants Opposition to the poor those who could not afford servants and aristocracy those who did not work Middle class moved to be away from workers James Cernshaw Most influential citizens of Manchester Housing act of 1827 houses could only be part of business if it was physically part of the building Houses were designed to promote the womanness of women Rooms where children worked servants lived women s room men s room Men s room guns room smoking room Women s room was among the drawing room art room Industrialization Remove women from production Most women continued to work Lower class women had to work Home was supposed to be a place of love o It could only be messed up if woman brings it in


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