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Comparison of Bacterial Communities in New England



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Microbial Ecology Comparison of Bacterial Communities in New England Sphagnum Bogs Using Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism T RFLP Sergio E Morales1 Paula J Mouser2 Naomi Ward3 4 Stephen P Hudman5 Nicholas J Gotelli5 Donald S Ross6 and Thomas A Lewis1 1 2 3 4 5 6 Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics University of Vermont 95 Carrigan Drive Burlington VT 05405 USA Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Vermont Burlington VT 05405 USA The Institute for Genomic Research 9712 Medical Center Drive Rockville MD 20850 USA Center of Marine Biotechnology 701 E Pratt St Baltimore MD 21202 USA Department of Biology University of Vermont Burlington VT 05405 USA Department of Plant and Soil Science University of Vermont Burlington VT 05405 USA Received 22 December 2004 Accepted 10 May 2005 Online publication 31 May 2006 Abstract Wetlands are major sources of carbon dioxide methane and other greenhouse gases released during microbial degradation Despite the fact that decomposition is mainly driven by bacteria and fungi little is known about the taxonomic diversity of bacterial communities in wetlands particularly Sphagnum bogs To explore bacterial community composition 24 bogs in Vermont and Massachusetts were censused for bacterial diversity at the surface oxic and 1 m anoxic regions Bacterial diversity was characterized by a terminal restriction fragment length T RFLP fingerprinting technique and a cloning strategy that targeted the 16S rRNA gene T RFLP analysis revealed a high level of diversity and a canonical correspondence analysis demonstrated marked similarity among bogs but consistent differences between surface and subsurface assemblages 16S rDNA sequences derived from one of the sites showed high numbers of clones belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria group Several other phyla were represented as well as two Candidate Division level taxonomic groups These data suggest that bog microbial communities are complex possibly



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