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RESEARCH ON SPOKEN LANGUAGE PROCESSING



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FREQUENCY AND AUTOMATICITY RESEARCH ON SPOKEN LANGUAGE PROCESSING Progress Report No 28 2007 Indiana University Frequency of Use Leads to Automaticity of Production Evidence from Repair in Conversation 1 Vsevolod Kapatsinski Speech Research Laboratory Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences Indiana University Bloomington Indiana 47405 1 I would like to thank the NIH for financial support through Training Grant DC 00012 and Research Grant DC 00111 and to Adam Albright Tessa Bent Joan Bybee Dan Jurafsky and the audiences at HDLS VII and the Workshop on Gradience and Frequency Effects in Phonology for helpful comments 161 KAPATSINSKI Frequency of Use Leads to Automaticity of Production Evidence from Repair in Conversation Abstract Investigation of spontaneous replacement repairs found in the Switchboard Corpus Godfrey et al 1992 shows that low frequency repaired words are more likely to be interrupted prior to replacement than high frequency words are These results provide novel empirical support to the hypothesis that the production of high frequency words is more automatic than the production of low frequency words Bybee 2002 Logan 1982 The relationship between the effects of frequency on interruptibility is argued to be partially mediated by the effect of frequency on duration In addition to testing the link between frequency and automaticity the present paper reports that replaced words tend to be more frequent than the words that replace them providing support for the hypothesis that high frequency words are easier to access in word production which has been criticized on the basis of not observing this frequency asymmetry in semantic substitution errors Garrett 2001 Finally whether a word is interrupted is found to depend strongly on the length of the word with long to bereplaced words being more likely to be interrupted than produced completely Thus while speakers prefer to produce constituents with a continuous delivery Clark Wasow 1998 the drive to



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