UMD GVPT 241 - Syllabus (5 pages)

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Syllabus



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Syllabus

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Pages:
5
School:
University of Maryland, College Park
Course:
Gvpt 241 - The Study of Political Philosophy: Ancient and Modern
The Study of Political Philosophy: Ancient and Modern Documents

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Introduction to Political Philosophy From Ancient to Modern Times GVPT 241 Online Summer 2007 Instructor Class Days E mail Dr zg Orhan Mon Wed Fri oorhan gvpt umd edu One thing is necessary above all if one is to practice reading as an art something which has been unlearned most thoroughly these days something for which one must almost be a cow and in any case not a modern man rumination Nietzsche On the Genealogy of Morality Course Description and Objectives The format of this course consists of threaded discussions of the assigned texts on the course website This course is a very brief introduction to the history of moral and political philosophy But what is political philosophy Simply put political philosophy is the activity of philosophers thinking through recurring trans historical and trans cultural questions of human life and presenting these reflections to their contemporaries and future generations Our guiding motif for this course is the relationship between morality and politics We are going to engage with questions of the following kind How does morality relate to politics Are morality and politics autonomous spheres of human life Is politics essentially amoral or immoral Why does politics have a bad name For instance what does it mean to politicize an issue Why does someone s being politically motivated imply blame We will seek answers to these questions by getting into conversation with past thinkers who reflected on the relationship between morality and politics We will have five guests of honor for this course and a few supplementary readings Plato and Cicero from antiquity Machiavelli from early modern times Kant and Nietzsche from late modernity Our objective in this course is to 1 gain an understanding of the persisting questions of politics and morality and the varying responses given by philosophers 2 think independently about the nature of political life 3 be able to read philosophical texts critically see the opening quote from Nietzsche and 4



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