NYU H72 3049 - Microforms (9 pages)

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Microforms



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Microforms

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Lecture Notes


Pages:
9
School:
New York University
Course:
H72 3049 - CULTURE OF ARCHIVES, MUSEUMS & LIBRARIES
CULTURE OF ARCHIVES, MUSEUMS & LIBRARIES Documents

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Samantha Oddi Spring 2010 H72 3049 Final Microforms Where They Come From and How They Are Experienced In the Information Age it can be difficult to comprehend that there is data that cannot be accessed from a computer Serial publications especially are assumed to be available instantly and electronically by many students in this the JSTOR and Google Books era There is a wealth of information available in the microform collections of university and major libraries around the world Both rare books and popular national daily newspapers can be found on microform along with a wide variety of publications on any number of subjects Over the decades microforms have been the source of novelty preservation controversy and neglect The history of microforms is relatively short compared to paper based media and ensuring a positive user experience requires a bit more work Despite its changes in status microforms are invaluable repositories of world history and they are still important to library collections The first known microforms were created by John Benjamin Dancer an English scientist in 1839 He created and began selling novelty texts and photographs so small that they were meant to be read with a microscope in 1953 Six years later a French optician named Rene Dagron patented microfilm and went into business 1 Later during the Franco Prussian War Dagron s microfilms were Shontz Marilyn L Microforms Nonbook Media American Library Association 1987 140 41 Print 1 used to send French messages across enemy lines tied to the feet of carrier pigeons 2 With the new century came new uses for microform technology By the early 1930 s microfilm machines were in use in hundreds of banks across the United States and The New York Times was being published on microfilm as well as traditional newsprint Harvard started using microform as a preservation medium in 1938 when the University discovered that their collection of foreign newspapers were rapidly deteriorating and that increased



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