UNM NVSC 105 - Lesson 22a - Damage Control Overview (16 pages)

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Lesson 22a - Damage Control Overview



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Lesson 22a - Damage Control Overview

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Lecture Notes


Pages:
16
School:
The University of New Mexico
Course:
Nvsc 105 - Naval Ships Systems I
Naval Ships Systems I Documents

Unformatted text preview:

Damage Control Overview Why Learn Damage Control Fire call the local fire department Flooding you either fix the damage or sink to the bottom Crew s responsibility to handle any ship damage Objectives Objectives of damage control Damage control organization Prevention aspects of DC Material conditions of readiness Maintenance of DC equipment Introduction Damage control includes both prevention and remedial measures Two basic objectives Take all practical preliminary measures before damage occurs to prevent it Limit and localize damage when it does occur DC abilities dependent upon prompt action by personnel DC Organization DC Organization a vital part of ship s battle organization Engineer DCA in charge of actions DC Central Controlling station for combating casualties Primary purpose is to collect and coordinate reports to determine what actions needed Tracks casualties maintains diagrams of status DC Organization Repair Parties DC groups set up to fight casualties Number ratings of people determined by number of personnel on ship Repair DC lockers store equipment Fire parties Made up of portion of repair parties Composition varies depending on ship size Preventing Casualties About 90 of damage control is done before the damage occurs PREVENTION Must work to ensure structural strength and watertight integrity maintained All personnel get trained in DC knowledge and procedures Compartmentalization Ships can have up to 600 watertight compartments Barrier to fires and flooding Prevents further damage Not effective if watertight integrity is not maintained Material Conditions of Readiness All doors hatches scuttles etc classified and marked Each material condition represents a degree of tightness security Maximum closure cannot be maintained at all times why Three conditions of readiness Material Conditions of Readiness X ray X X Yoke Y Provides least protection Set when ship not in danger of attack well protected harbor More protection Set in unprotected harbor after



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