UT AST 301 - Lecture notes (18 pages)

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Lecture notes



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Lecture notes

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Lecture Notes


Pages:
18
School:
University of Texas at Austin
Course:
Ast 301 - Introduction to Astronomy
Introduction to Astronomy Documents

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Monday Feb 21 Syllabus and class notes are at www as utexas edu go to courses AST301 Introduction to Astronomy Lacy Reading for this week Chapter 8 If you want help on anything covered in the course come to discussion session Thursday at 6 00 in RLM 15 216B We hope to have the test graded by Friday Topics from last Wednesday How does the Sun generate the energy that is radiated from its surface Describe the first reaction in the proton proton chain of nuclear reactions in the Sun What is the overall result of the nuclear reactions in the Sun How does Einstein s equation E m c2 help explain how nuclear reactions generate energy Describe how neutrinos allow us to observe the interior of the Sun and say what was found Topics for this week Describe how astronomers measure temperatures of stars How do astronomers use parallax to measure the distances to stars Why does parallax vary inversely with distance Describe and explain the relationship between a star s apparent brightness or flux its absolute brightness or luminosity and its distance from us Describe and explain the relationship between a star s luminosity its radius and its temperature and how this relationship is used to measure radii of stars Sketch an H R diagram showing the location of main sequence stars red giants and white dwarfs Explain how astronomers measure masses of stars Describe how the luminosities of main sequence stars are related to their masses Three types of spectra Continuous spectra hot dense objects solids or dense gasses emit light at all wavelengths with hotter objects emitting more short wavelength light Emission line spectrum if a gas is hotter than whatever is behind it bright lines will be seen in its spectrum Absorption line spectra if a gas lies between an object emitting a continuous spectrum and the observer and if that gas is cooler than the object it will absorb some of the light from the object causing dark lines in the spectrum Spectra of stars The deep layers of the



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