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DCCCD ENGL 1301 - Syllabus

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FALL SEMESTER 2011 English 1301 ONLINE FLEX TERM Composition I Instructor: Shazia Ali, Ph.D Office: G216 Phone: (972) 391-1067 Email: [email protected] OFFICE HOURS: If you are unable to meet during posted office hours, please see me to make an appointment. MW 10.00 – 12.00 p.m. TH 12.30 – 1.30 p.m. Warning: This class may contain short stories, novels, and movies that may be considered offensive to some individuals. Students who feel uncomfortable in such situations should consider enrolling in a different English 1301 class. COURSE DESCRIPTION: English 1301: Composition I (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: One of the following must be met: 1. Developmental Reading 0093 AND Developmental Writing 0093; 2. English as a Second Language (ESOL) 0044 AND 0054; or 3. Have met Texas Success Initiative (TSI) Reading and Writing standards. This course focuses on student writing. It emphasizes reading and analytical thinking and introduces research skills. Students practice writing for a variety of audiences and purposes. Coordinating Board Approval Number (3 Lec): 2304015112 REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS: Kirszner & Mandell. Patterns for College Writing: A Rhetorical Reader and Guide. 2009 MLA Update. 11th ed. Bedford/St. Martins, 2010. ISBN: 9780312488413 STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:  Understand and demonstrate the importance of purpose and audience.  Produce unified, coherent and developed essays above the 12th grade level.  Participate effectively in groups.  Understand and apply the basic principles of critical thinking, problem solving, and technical proficiency in the development of exposition and argument.  Understand and appropriately apply modes of expression, i.e., descriptive, expositive, narrative, scientific, and self-expressive, in written, visual and oral communication.  Analyze and interpret a variety of printed materials – books, short stories, articles. Understand and demonstrated proficiency as dictated by the writing process – planning, drafting, shaping, revising, editing and proofreading.  Use computer-based technology in communication, solving problems, acquiring information.  Understand and utilize vocabulary above the 12th grade level.  Understand the basic principles of research. Grading Scale: A = 90 – 100 B = 80 – 89 C = 70 – 79 D = 60 – 69 F = 0 – 59 Method of Evaluation: Essays 400 Points @ 100 pts each Discussion Board 70 Points @ 10 pts each Quizzes 50 Points @ 10 pts each Journals 80 Points @ 10 pts each Timed Writing 150 Points @ 100 pts – TW1 & 50 pts – TW2 Group Work 50 Points Total 800 Points WRITING EXPECTATIONS: Students will compose essays that adhere to grammatical and stylistic standards of academic American English and that follow Modern Language Association (MLA) style. Essays will need to adhere to stylistic, topic, and length requirements designated for each assignment. Essays will be graded according to students’ ability to follow specific assignment guidelines, grammatical instruction, and MLA style requirements. FINANCIAL AID STUDENTS: If you are receiving Financial Aid grants or loans, you must begin attendance in all classes. Do not drop or stop attending any class without consulting the Financial Aid Office. Changes in your enrollment level and failing grades may require that you repay financial aid funds. Failure to contact the instructor will result in your name being submitted to the Financial Aid Office as a ―non-attendee.‖ All students receiving financial aid must open an Email account through NetMail. See directions in this syllabus for opening an Email account. Financial Aid Statement for Distance Learning ClassesIf you are receiving Financial Aid grants or loans and are enrolled in a Distance Learning class, you must show participation in this class prior to the certification date by either e-mailing or contacting the instructor or logging on to eCampus. Do not drop or stop attending any class without consulting the Financial Aid Office. Changes in your enrollment level and failing grades may require that you repay financial aid funds. ACADEMIC HONESTY AND PLAGIARISM: ACADEMIC HONESTY & PLAGIARISM Scholastic dishonesty is a violation of the Code of Student Conduct. Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating on a test, plagiarism, and collusion. As a college student, you are considered a responsible adult. Your enrollment indicates acceptance of the DCCCD Code of Student Conduct published in the DCCCD Catalog at http://www1.dcccd.edu/cat0506/ss/code.cfm Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating on tests, plagiarism and collusion. Cheating includes copying from another student’s test or homework paper, using materials not authorized, collaborating with or seeking aid from another student during a test, knowingly using, buying, selling, stealing, or soliciting the contents of an unadministered test, and substituting for another person to take a test. Plagiarism is the appropriating, buying, receiving as a gift, or obtaining by any means another’s work and the unacknowledged submission or incorporation of it in one’s own written work. Collusion is the unauthorized collaboration with another person in preparing written work for fulfillment of course requirements. Academic dishonesty is a serious offense in college. You can be given a failing grade on an assignment or test, can be failed for the class, or you can even be suspended from college. In any written paper, you are guilty of the academic offense known as plagiarism if you partially or entirely copy the author’s sentences, words. For such an offense, a student will receive a zero on the assignment and can receive an F for the course. You cannot mix the author’s words with your own or ―plug‖ your synonyms into the author’s sentence structure. To prevent unintentional borrowing, resist the temptation to look at the source as you write. The author’s words, phrases, sentences must be put in your words, in your way of writing. When you do this, you are demonstrating the ability of understanding and comprehension. If you summarize, paraphrase or directly quote from an author, you must use the appropriate documentation because the ‘idea(s)’ still belong to the author. Please be advised that academic dishonesty and plagiarism are serious issues that may result in serious consequences.


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