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Human Rights Policy

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Carr Center for Human Rights Policy 1999-2000 Annual Report1CARR CENTER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS POLICY1999-2000 ANNUAL REPORTI. Research and PublicationsCase StudiesBook SeriesRealizing Human Rights: Moving from Inspiration to ImpactWorking Paper SeriesInformation Technology and Human RightsSummer Research Award Development of Program AreasResearch Fellows for 2000-2001II. TeachingHuman Rights Policy Study GroupHuman Rights Course GuideIII. Training & FacilitationNon-Governmental Organizations Facilitation Physicians for Human Rights workshopLawyers Committee for Human Rights In the National Interest project“Lessons Learned” conference on KosovoDomestic Human Rights Pilot Project: Human Rights in IdahoIV. Outreach and EventsOutreachWebsite and mailing list Student involvementFundraisingEventsV. Staff and FellowsBiographies and activityCarr Center for Human Rights Policy 1999-2000 Annual Report2VI. Prospects for 2000-2001ResearchFellows researchThe International Criminal CourtThe Development of NormsTraining SkillsThe Use of Force and Human RightsThe Prevention and Punishment of GenocideTeachingCarr Center for Human Rights Policy 1999-2000 Annual Report3I. Carr Center Research and PublicationsCASE STUDIESUnder the auspices of the Carr Center’s Domestic Human Rights Policy Program, the Center has commissioned the development of two Kennedy School of Government case studies, which will both support the domestic initiative and be incorporated into KSG courses on political leadership, state and local governance, and human rights. The first case, commissioned for KSG Lecturer Martin Linsky, is entitled “Mayor Steve Judy of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, and the Parade Permit Request by Neo-Nazis” (2000) and concerns appropriate local governmental responses to the activities of hate groups. A second case is being developed that will concern the integration of respect for diversity and human rights into a community dialogue and the cultivation of the tools, coalitions and techniques needed to launch a local human rights campaign. We hope to encourage further curriculum development around human rights issues at the Kennedy School and elsewhere.BOOK SERIESThe Carr Center has launched a book series on human rights policy. The first such volume is Realizing Human Rights: Moving from Inspiration to Impact, edited by Samantha Power and Graham Allison (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2000). At the dawn of a new era, this book brings together leading activists, policy-makers and critics to reflect upon a half century of attempts to advance human rights. Authors include President Jimmy Carter, who helped inject human rights concerns into U.S. policy; Wei Jingsheng, who struggled to reform China from within; Louis Henkin, the modern “father” of international law; and Richard Goldstone, the former chief prosecutor for the Yugoslav and Rwandan war crimes tribunals. A half-century since the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the time is right to assess how policies and actions effect the realization of human rights and to identify new directions and challenges that lie ahead.Samantha Power is also writing a book, The Quiet Americans (New York: Random House, 2001). Power examines the meaning of “genocide,” the quest for passage of the Genocide Convention and the U.S. political, military and legal responses to genocide since the Holocaust.WORKING PAPERSInformation Technology and Human RightsAs part of its collaboration with the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights in helping the organization develop its quadrennial In the National Interest publication, the Center produced a chapter on Information Technology and Human Rights. The piece, which drew on KSG student research from 1999, argues that the U.S. government should expand international Internet access and broaden its conception of Internet training in order to maximize the Internet’s potential contributions to democracy and human rights. The initial version was published in June 2000 as a Carr Center Working Paper.Carr Center for Human Rights Policy 1999-2000 Annual Report4SUMMER RESEARCH AWARDIn March 2000, the Center launched a summer research award to encourage students at the Kennedy School to engage in work with a human rights organization. The award provides a stipend to a first year student in the MPP, MPA-ID or MPA2 program to work with a human rights organization for 10 weeks in the summer. This stipend allows students to gain experience that is central to their academic program and lays the groundwork for a PAE or 2nd year paper related to the work of the organization. The recipient for the summer of 2000 was Lawrence Woocher, an MPP student who worked at the Brussels office of the International Crisis Group.DEVELOPMENT OF PROGRAM AREASDuring its first year, the Center’s main focus was developing a strategic plan, which entailed identifying the main substantive areas of focus for research, teaching and training, and developing the core components in each area. The Center sought to identify existing gaps in human rights research, and otherwise define the realms in which it could offer a comparative advantage. The Center selected areas of substantive focus (the use of force, transitional justice, non-governmental organizations, and domestic human rights policy), and has begun developing and implementing research, teaching and training components for each program. The Center also developed a Fellows Program, including recruiting fellows for 2000-2001. The Center also has begun soliciting sources of support for its programs. II. TeachingHUMAN RIGHTS POLICY STUDY GROUPHuman Rights Policy: Walking the WalkSamantha Power led an Institute of Politics study group in the fall of 1999. The well-subscribed class surveyed the ongoing growth in human rights consciousness and identified forces and institutions fueling its expansion. It highlighted some of the issues dividing even those who share a commitment to human rights, and explored the normative and institutional proliferation of the last half century, scrutinizing several devices put in place to advance human rights. With the help of the guest speakers, occasional documentary screenings, and three case studies (Rwanda, Bosnia and South Africa), the course assessed the strengths and weaknesses of UN peacekeeping, internationally mandated “safe areas,” war crimes tribunals, and truth commissions, and looked ahead to the next century’s instruments for human rights


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