Stanford STS 145 - Sega and The Demise of the Dreamcast (11 pages)

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Sega and The Demise of the Dreamcast



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Sega and The Demise of the Dreamcast

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Lecture Notes


Pages:
11
School:
Stanford University
Course:
Sts 145 - History of Computer Game Design
History of Computer Game Design Documents

Unformatted text preview:

Sega and The Demise of the Dreamcast by Darryl Reeves Sega has had a long and inconsistent history in the videogame industry The Japanese company has released numerous game systems system add ons and actual games since the 8 bit days of the Sega Master System Sega no longer manufactures video game systems but they are still going strong in the video game industry as a software maker Many hardware manufacturers have come and gone throughout the short history of console games 3DO Neo Geo Atari Phillips etc but Sega is arguably the most interesting case because they once held a solid grasp of the video game world in the face of fierce competition from Nintendo So the question arises what went wrong The best way to examine this issue is to analyze their efforts at making competitive hardware systems and look at their last foray into the very expensive videogame hardware industry the Dreamcast What started out as a very promising comeback for Sega ended up in failure and their subsequent exit from the hardware market In the case of the Dreamcast Sega s lack of financial muscle their rush to market and failure to learn from past mistakes caused this exit despite a worthy system creative games and marketing and a huge head start to market in comparison to the competition Sega According to Sega of America s website www sega com Sega s beginning dates back to 1940 when the company was called Standard Games and based in Honolulu Hawaii The company moved to Tokyo Japan in 1952 and was renamed Service Games of Japan At this time the company was in the business of coin operated machines The company merged with Rosen Enterprises another coin operated machine maker in 1965 In 1969 the company was sold to Gulf Western Industries The website goes on to say that the company did very well in the early part of the 1980 s based on Gulf Western building on Sega s solid product and marketing strategy which included many ground breaking games as well as the companies first console game



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