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Personal Protective Equipment and First Aid



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Personal Protective Equipment and First Aid Montana State University Pesticide Safety Education Program Topics Personal Protective Equipment Mode of Entry Specimen Label Decontamination First Aid Poisoning Responses What to look for Heat Stroke Mode of Entry Rate of Absorption Specimen Label Access at www greenbook com Information regarding personal protective equipment for specific chemical First Aid Information REI Restricted Entry Interval Gives you toxicity category Signal Words Danger Poison I Very High Toxicity Danger I High Toxicity Warning II Moderate Toxicity Caution III Low Toxicity Caution IV Relatively Nontoxic CAUTION What does this mean PPE Chronic Toxicity The delayed effects of repeated exposures over a long period of time Effects evaluated in the lab include Potential tumors Birth defects Reproductive effects Agricultural Use Requirements Protect Yourself 4 modes of entry Oral Dermal Cuts and Abrasions Respiratory Eyes Good Practices Sound Personal Cleanliness Dermal Protective Garments Respiratory Devices if needed It is LAW to wear minimum PPE stated on label Take it slow and consider Weather heat precip Hazards PPE Coveralls Chemical Resistant Suits Gloves Footwear Aprons and Headgear Protective Eyewear Respirators Coveralls Types of Fabrics Wovens Unwovens Coated Laminate Wovens Wovens Low Toxicity Granulars Dusts Caution Blue Jeans Cotton Coveralls Absorb Chemicals For Toxicity Class III or IV CAUTION Cotton tight weave Kleenguard coveralls Pants or Coveralls Beware of rips in garments Reusable Nonwovens For Toxicity Class II Warning Nonwovens Low Toxicity Liquid Granulars Dusts Powders Warning Synthetic Materials Tyvek Comfort Gard Kleenguard LP Tyvek QC Saranex Coated Laminate Suits Danger For Toxicity Class I PVC Nitrile Rubber Tychem sealed seems Non breathable Do not use rain suits with cotton liners Gloves Want unlined gloves Nitrile Neoprene PVC Do Not Wear Leather Gloves Do Not Wear exam gloves Check for holes often Want 14 mils or higher Relative Costs 2002 Nitrile Good overall protection 2 39 pr Neoprene Softer better dexterity 5 16 Natural Rubber Use only on dry or water based formulations 11 18 00 pr Butyl For High Toxicity Pesticides 18 45 PVC Anyhydrous ammonia 4 00 pr Viton Superior Protection but 174 50 pr Head and Neck Covering Straw Hat Ball Cap Hard Hat Hoods Beware of sweat bands with hats which cause continuous skin contact Hoods Never use permeable materials If hood is made of non permeable materials Yes Tychem Hood Tyvek Hood Hood offers no openings for pesticides to seep in Eyewear Goggles Face Shields Safety Glasses But never wear contacts when spraying pesticides Respirators Read Specimen Label Cartridge Fitted facepiece and replaceable filters Not for fumigants Prefix of NIOSH MSHA TC Supplied Air Fumigants or life threatening atmospheres Critical Respiratory Scenario s Pesticides are formulated Pouring into a sprayer tank Operators exposed directly to dusts sprays or aerosals Fits TEST ALWAYS Positive Pressure Test Close exhalation valve and exhale Negative Pressure Test Close off the inlet opening of the cartridge by covering with your palm Inspect PPE Make sure you have no smells What should you do Cartridges expired renew every year Is it clean and has it been cleaned Decontamination Always clean your re usable PPE this includes Nitrile Gloves Goggles Laminated Coveralls Do not reuse Tyvek coveralls if used on Category Warning or Danger chemicals How Varies according to what you spray and what your PPE is Mix heavy duty soap and hot water in bucket Throw all contaminated clothing in plastic bag Keep all gloves on while taking off clothing Dip hands with gloves in bucket wash eye goggles and manually clean respirator Put away to dry With Gloves on take suit off and discard place in washer or cleaned with a brush coated laminate Dip hands with gloves again then dip foot wear and discard Then clean up area bucket tailgate Then clean gloves and discard Beware of washing in washer separate washer daily and with hot water and extra rinse cycle Storage Store in a clean dry place away from pesticides and containers Avoid direct sunlight and high temperatures First Aid and Emergency Situations Speed is the key factor but consider Is victim breathing Artificial Respiration Decontaminate the victim Heatstroke or Chemical Contamination Call a physician or 911 First Aid How Read Pesticide Label for Special First Aid Instructions Always call a physician or 911 Remove victim from contaminated environment Clean contaminate from individual if evident Do not contaminate yourself with mouth to mouth contact clean Save pesticide container Specific Treatment Skin Drench skin and clothing with water Remove clothing Clean skin and hair thoroughly with soap and water Dry and wrap in blanket continued Eye Hold eyelids open wash eyes with gentle stream of clean running water immediately Don t delay Wash for 15 minutes or more Do not use commercial eye washes Inhaled Poisons Do not go in without respirator Carry victim to fresh air Loosen all tight clothing If convulsing protect him her from falling and striking head continued Swallowed Poisons Call a physician Do not induce vomiting unless a noncorrosive substance has been swallowed not Lye acids Lysol Initiate gag reflex Place victim face down Get to hospital If corrosive give milk or water continued Chemical skin burns Remove contaminated clothing Wash with large quantities of water Cover with clean cloth or blanket Get to hospital Heat Stress Pesticide users are at higher risk More clothing Toxic environments Other stress factors Hard work More exposed to sun Difficult to drink water Heat Stroke Body s thermoregulatory system stops working Many of the symptoms are the same as for heat exhaustion But there are additional symptoms cessation of sweating difficulty walking disorientation and fainting or unconsciousness Heat Stoke Points to Consider Heat Stroke can permanently damage your health If you get heatstroke once you may be likely to get it again First Aid Key symptom to look for is disorientation A person who is functioning well mentally isn t in danger Someone who s becoming jelly brained is in trouble Stop what you are doing and get out of the sun preferably into an airconditioned building Pack ice around the patient s neck armpit and groin Splash water on the skin and fan them Elevate the legs If the person is conscious give plenty of fluids 1 to 2 quarts preferably a sports beverage but


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