UMass Amherst ART 297T/597AA - Syllabus (9 pages)

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Syllabus



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Syllabus

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Pages:
9
School:
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Course:
Art 297t/597aa - History and Theory of Historic Preservation
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Art 297T 597AA History and Theory of Historic Preservation Spring 2005 Thursdays 1 30 4 00 Professor Max Page Office 452 Fine Arts Center 545 6952 Email mpage art umass edu Office Hours by appointment This course examines the history and theory of historic preservation focusing on the United States but with reference to traditions and practices in other countries The course will give students a grounding in the history theory and practice of historic preservation but is not an applied technical course We will not for example be examining in great detail the practice of building conservation and restoration The course is designed to examine the largely untold history of the historic preservation movement in this country and explore what laws public policies and cultural attitudes shape how we preserve or do not preserve the built environment The course will also involve visits to historic preservation sites Students will have the opportunity to pursue either a traditional research paper or an applied project Graduates students from public history as well as from architecture and landscape architecture and other disciplines are welcome Readings The books for this course can be purchased at Food for Thought Books on North Pleasant Street Other readings will be distributed via email in class or on the web Books Arnold Alanen and Robert Melnick eds Preserving Cultural Landscapes in America Dolores Hayden The Power of Place Urban Landscapes as Public History Brian Ladd The Ghosts of Berlin Confronting German History in the Urban Landscape Page and Mason Giving Preservation a History Histories of Historic Preservation in the United States Walkowitz and Knauer Memory and the Impact of Political Transformation in Public Space Course Requirements 1 Class Attendance and Participation A lecture class in which one doesn t say a single word all semester might actually be enjoyable and intellectually stimulating depending on the quality of the readings and lectures A seminar however depends on the regular informed energetic participation of its members I am strongly committed to encouraging everyone to participate in class discussions 2 Weekly Commentaries In order to spark discussion I would like each of you to email me by midnight the night before class a brief no more than one page series of questions or commentary about the topic and or readings for that week The weekly questions and comments will not be graded but you must do them i e not submitting them will affect your grade 3 Short Papers There are two short 2 4 pages papers for the course 1 Historic building or landscape I would like you to visit a significant historical building or place of your choice and write a paper evaluating that place how it is or is not being preserved and what the value of the place is Due at the beginning of class February 10 or whenever that class is rescheduled 2 Amherst Historical Commission I would like you to attend a regular public meeting of the Amherst Historical Commission and write a paper evaluating the meeting What issues were covered what particularly struck you what the meeting says about how preservation is done Due at the beginning of class April 7 4 Group Projects The heart of the course is the group project which you will spend the semester working on with two or three others Each is a real historic preservation project and not make work Each group will produce a final project that will be of great use to institutions and individuals who you will be assisting You should read through the project and be prepared today to list which projects you would like to work on in order of preference I will decide the groups within a day or two and email the entire group and urge you to plan a group meeting immediately You will present your findings to the group on May 12 the final projects will be due May 19 no extensions Along with the document you will produce with the group each of you will write a 10 page paper reflecting on the experience the complexities the frustrations the excitement of the group project The projects are as follows 2 1 Historic District Nomination for the University of Massachusetts Campus For many at UMass our buildings hardly seem historic or even very nice But in fact UMass has a number of buildings that are quite old as well as a number of modern structures that are by very important architects Edward Durrell Stone Marcel Breuer Kevin Roche among others And the campus design itself reflects important mid century ideas about how to design a campus This group will prepare National Register nomination papers for a UMass historic district You can get an early jump on how to do this by looking at the links for our discussion on February 24 This involves researching the historic of the buildings making an argument which ones are significant and why and deciding the boundaries of the district among other tasks The cutting edge of historic preservation is figuring out what modern buildings one s that are getting to be almost 50 years old deserve some form of protection Contact Jonathan Tucker interim Director Amherst Planning Department tuckerj amherstma gov 256 4040 2 An H H Richardson Train Station in Holyoke A train station in Holyoke by one of America s most important architects and considered one of the most important endangered historic sites in Massachusetts is currently being used for the storage of auto parts The goal of the group will be to develop a series of options for the private owner and for the city of Holyoke that might help preserve the building and develop more compatible and public uses for the station This is what Preservation Massachusetts wrote announcing its inclusion of the station in its 2004 Ten Most Endangered Historic Resources The Connecticut River Railroad Station in Holyoke resulted from collaboration between H H Richardson and Frederick Law Olmstead to plan several train stations along the Boston Albany and the Connecticut River lines Designed by Richardson himself in his namesake style the Holyoke structure is painstakingly engineered into its surrounding landscape and positioned to form an axis between the gateway welcoming immigrants to the city and Immaculate Conception the neighborhood church 2003 Ten Most Endangered Contact Jeff Hayden economic development planner City of Holyoke 413 322 5655 haydenj ci holyoke ma us 3 3 The Preservation and Interpretation of W E B DuBois Home Site in Great Barrington MA One of most important intellectuals


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