U of U FCS 5400 - The Divorce Generation (21 pages)

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The Divorce Generation



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The Divorce Generation

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Pages:
21
School:
University of Utah
Course:
Fcs 5400 - Families and Economic Policy
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This article was downloaded by EBSCOHost EJS Content Distribution On 30 September 2009 Access details Access Details subscription number 911724993 Publisher Routledge Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number 1072954 Registered office Mortimer House 37 41 Mortimer Street London W1T 3JH UK Journal of Divorce Remarriage Publication details including instructions for authors and subscription information http www informaworld com smpp title content t792306891 The Divorce Generation Renata Forste a Tim B Heaton b a Department of Sociology Brigham Young University Provo UT USA b Department of Sociology Family Studies Center Brigham Young University Provo UT USA Online Publication Date 15 June 2004 To cite this Article Forste Renata and Heaton Tim B 2004 The Divorce Generation Journal of Divorce Remarriage 41 1 95 114 To link to this Article DOI 10 1300 J087v41n01 06 URL http dx doi org 10 1300 J087v41n01 06 PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE Full terms and conditions of use http www informaworld com terms and conditions of access pdf This article may be used for research teaching and private study purposes Any substantial or systematic reproduction re distribution re selling loan or sub licensing systematic supply or distribution in any form to anyone is expressly forbidden The publisher does not give any warranty express or implied or make any representation that the contents will be complete or accurate or up to date The accuracy of any instructions formulae and drug doses should be independently verified with primary sources The publisher shall not be liable for any loss actions claims proceedings demand or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever caused arising directly or indirectly in connection with or arising out of the use of this material Downloaded By EBSCOHost EJS Content Distribution At 00 08 30 September 2009 The Divorce Generation Well Being Family Attitudes and Socioeconomic Consequences of Marital Disruption Renata Forste Tim B Heaton ABSTRACT Using data from the General Social Survey GSS we examine mean differences in measures of well being family attitudes and socioeconomic status for individuals divorced remarried or in a first marriage We sample individuals first married between 1965 and 1975 of which 48 percent reported being divorced or separated from their spouses Overall our comparisons support the divorce stress adjustment perspective in that the divorced separated report the lowest levels of well being relative to those in their first marriage and they support the protective effect of marriage as remarried individuals report higher levels of well being relative to the still divorced or separated Article copies available for a fee from The Haworth Document Delivery Service 1 800 HAWORTH E mail address docdelivery haworthpress com Website http www HaworthPress com 2004 by The Haworth Press Inc All rights reserved KEYWORDS Divorce remarriage marriage gender differences Renata Forste PhD is Associate Professor 852 SWKT Department of Sociology Brigham Young University Provo UT 84602 E mail renata forste byu edu Tim B Heaton PhD is Associate Professor 380C SWKT Department of Sociology Family Studies Center Brigham Young University Provo UT 84602 E mail tim heaton byu edu Journal of Divorce Remarriage Vol 41 1 2 2004 http www haworthpress com web JDR 2004 by The Haworth Press Inc All rights reserved Digital Object Identifier 10 1300 J087v41n01 06 95 Downloaded By EBSCOHost EJS Content Distribution At 00 08 30 September 2009 96 JOURNAL OF DIVORCE REMARRIAGE Divorce has transformed the social economic and cultural landscape of the U S Only about five percent of first marriages ended in divorce during the 19th century whereas today demographers estimate that half of all first marriages will end in divorce Amato 2000 Cherlin 1992 Preston McDonald 1979 We have now reached a point where substantial numbers of married couples have lived through the high divorce years of the 1970s Starting in the late 1960s divorce rates began to increase they peaked around the early 1980s and then began a slight decline Goldstein 1999 Heaton 2002 National Center for Health Statistics 1995 Of the couples first married between 1965 and 1975 and interviewed in the General Social Survey GSS between 1989 and 1994 48 percent reported having divorced or being separated from their spouses Because divorce rates have now reversed to a modest decline it appears likely that subsequent marriage cohorts will experience lower cumulative probabilities of disruption Heaton 2002 We refer to this marriage cohort 1965 75 as the divorce generation Substantial research has documented the numerous benefits of marriage including economic security and personal well being Waite Gallagher 2000 The growing record of evidence in support of marriage is impressive but many of these studies focus on relatively short term consequences The purpose of our work is to assess the long term consequences of marital disruption in the cohort that has experienced the highest rates of divorce in U S history We focus in particular on three domains of experience namely social psychological and physical wellbeing attitudes toward the family and socioeconomic status Comparisons of the first married the remarried and the currently divorced or separated in these domains give some idea of the impact changes in marriage patterns are having on society In addition we consider how the effects of divorce or marriage differ for men and women and if differences found between married and divorced individuals are due in part to selection effects BACKGROUND Divorce and Marriage Perspectives The divorce stress adjustment perspective views divorce not as a single event but as a process that begins before the actual divorce takes place and continues long after the marriage has legally ended The process of divorce includes many events that are stressful for individuals and these stresses have negative emotional behavioral and health out Downloaded By EBSCOHost EJS Content Distribution At 00 08 30 September 2009 Renata Forste and Tim B Heaton 97 comes for family members involved Various factors may mediate the level of stress and negativity that individuals experience during the divorce process including demographic characteristics such as age race and ethnicity Amato 2000 In contrast to the divorce stress adjustment model the selection perspective argues that poorly adjusted individuals are selected out of marriage According to this


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