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Learning Styles and Tutoringhttp://www.metamath.com//lsweb/dvclearn.htmhttp://www.trcc.commnet.edu/ed_resources/tasc/Training/Learning_Styles.htmThe Visual/ Verbal Learning StyleLearning Styles and Tutoringhttp://www.metamath.com//lsweb/dvclearn.htmhttp://www.trcc.commnet.edu/ed_resources/tasc/Training/Learning_Styles.htmhttp://geocities.com/kissmytiarasThe Visual/ Verbal Learning Style You learn best when information is presented visually and in a written language format. In a classroom setting, you benefit from instructors who use the blackboard (or overhead projector) to list the essential points of a lecture, or who provide you with an outline to follow along with during lecture. You benefit from information obtained from textbooks and class notes. You tend to like to study by yourself in a quiet room. You often see information "in your mind's eye" when you are trying to remember something. Learning Strategies for the Visual/ Verbal Learner: - To aid recall, make use of "color coding" when studying new information in your textbook or notes. Using highlighter pens, highlight different kinds of information in contrasting colors.- Write out sentences and phrases that summarize key information obtained from your textbook and lecture. - Make flashcards of vocabulary words and concepts that need to be memorized. Use highlighter pens to emphasize key points on the cards. Limit the amount of information per card so your mind can take a mental "picture" of the information. - When learning information presented in diagrams or illustrations, write out explanations for the information. - When learning mathematical or technical information, write out in sentences and key phrases your understanding of the material. When a problem involves a sequence of steps, write out in detail how to do each step. - Make use of computer word processing. Copy key information from your notes and textbook into a computer. Use the print-outs for visual review. - Before an exam, make yourself visual reminders of information that must be memorized. Make "stick it" notes containing key words and concepts and place them in highly visible places --on your mirror, notebook, car dashboard, etc.The Visual/ Nonverbal Learning Style You learn best when information is presented visually and in a picture or design format. In a classroom setting, you benefit from instructors who use visual aids such as film, video, maps and charts. You benefit from information obtained from the pictures and diagrams in textbooks. You tend to like to work in a quiet room and may not like to work in study groups. When trying to remember something, you can often visualize a picture of it in your mind. You may have an artistic side that enjoys activities ha ving to do with visual art and design. Learning Strategies for the Visual/ Nonverbal Learner: - Make flashcards of key information that needs to be memorized. Draw symbols and pictures on the cards to facilitate recall. Use highlighter pens to highlight key words and pictures on the flashcards. Limit the amount of information per card, so your mind can take a mental "picture' of the information. - Mark up the margins of your textbook with key words, symbols, and diagrams that help you remember the text. Use highlighter pens of contrasting colors to "color code" the information. - When learning mathematical or technical information, make charts to organize the information. When a mathematical problem involves a sequence of steps, draw a series of boxes, each containing the appropriate bit of information in sequence. - Use large square graph paper to assist in creating charts and diagrams that illustrate key concepts. - Use the computer to assist in organizing material that needs to be memorized. Using word processing, create tables and charts with graphics that help you to understand and retain course material. Use spreadsheet and database software to further organize m aterial that needs to be learned. - As much as possible, translate words and ideas into symbols, pictures, and diagrams.The Tactile/ Kinesthetic Learning Style You learn best when physically engaged in a "hands on" activity. In the classroom, you benefit from a lab setting where you can man ipulate materials to learn new information. You learn best when you can be physically active in the learning environment. You benefit from instructors who encourage in-class demonstrations, "hands on" student learning experiences, and field work outside t he classroom. Strategies for the Tactile/ Kinesthetic Learner:- To help you stay focused on class lecture, sit near the front of the room and take notes throughout the class period. Don't worry about correct spelling or writing in complete sentences. Jot down key words and draw pictures or make charts to help you remember the information you are hearing. - When studying, walk back and forth with textbook, notes, or flashcards in hand and read the information out loud. - Think of ways to make your learning tangible, i.e. something you can put your hands on. For example, make a model that illustrates a key concept. Spend extra time in a lab setting to learn an important procedure. Spend time in the field (e.g. a museum, hi storical site, or job site) to gain first-hand experience of your subject matter. - To learn a sequence of steps, make 3'x 5' flashcards for each step. Arrange the cards on a table top to represent the correct sequence. Put words, symbols, or pictures on your flashcards -- anything that helps you remember the information. Use highlighter pens in contrasting colors to emphasize important points. Limit the amount of information per card to aid recall. Practice putting the cards in order until the sequence becomes automatic. - When reviewing new information, copy key points onto a chalkboard, easel board, or other large writing surface. - Make use of the computer to reinforce learning through the sense of touch. Using word processing software, copy essential information from your notes and textbook. Use graphics, tables, and spreadsheets to further organize material that must be learned. - Listen to audio tapes on a Walkman tape player while exercising. Make your own tapes containing important course information.The Auditory/ Verbal Learning Style You learn best when information is presented auditory in an oral language format. In a classroom setting, you benefit from listening to lecture and participating in group discussions. You also benefit from obtaining


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