New version page

Study Guide

Upgrade to remove ads

This preview shows page 1-2-3-4 out of 11 pages.

Save
View Full Document
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 11 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 11 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 11 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 11 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience

Upgrade to remove ads
Unformatted text preview:

Study GuideBulliet, chapter 5An Age of Empires: Rome and Han China1. natural resources of Italy2. location, location, location3. the “anchor” of the early Roman economy4. Roman conquests of Italy5. Roman Republic6. Roman women7. Roman slavery8. Roman Senate9. patron/client relationship10. Wars with Carthage11. Second Punic War 218 to 202 BC.E.12. Hannibal and Scipio13. Wars with Hellenized eastern kingdoms & city states14. Roman rule of provinces15. Roman citizenship and military service16. expansion of the empirea. long terms for military serviceb. dispossession of small farmerc. expanded use of slave labor powerd. rise of latufundiae. increasing concentrations of wealthf. increasing concentrations of political power17. Slave revolts --- Sicilian slave revolts and Spartacusa. First Slave Revolt 135-132 B.C.E.b. Second Slave Revolt 104-100 B.C.E.c. The Revolt of Spartacus 73-71 B.C.E.18. dispossessed of Rome19. Rome as a urban center20. Gracchi 137 to 121 BCE --- The Gracchi brothers, Tiberius and Gaius, went downin history as two martyrs to the cause of social reform. Both were killed by members of the Senate for attempting to make the system more friendly to the lower classes of Rome.21. bread and circuses22. Spartacus and Crassusa. Spartacus biob. Spartacus as gladiatorc. Spartacus as warrior/commanderd. Spartacus and Crixuse. Spartacus and Davidf. Crassus biog. Crassus’s bid for gloryh. Crassus and Pompey23. From: SpartacusBy Howard Fast“Go back to the Senate (said Spartacus) and give them the ivory rod. I make you legate. Go back and tell them what you saw here. Tell them that they sent their cohorts against us, and that we have destroyed their cohorts. Tell them that we are slaves ---- what they call the instrumentum vocale. The tool with a voice. Tell them what our voice says. We say that the world is tired of them, tired of your rotten Senate and your rotten Rome. The world is tired of the wealth and splendor that you have squeezed out of our blood and bone. The world is tired of the song of the whip. It is the only song the noble Romans know. But we don’t want to hear that song anymore. In the beginning all me were alike and they lived in peace and they shared among them what they had. But now there are two kinds of men, the master and the slave. Bu there are more of us than there are of you, many more. And we are stronger than you, better than you. All that is good in mankind belongs to us. We cherish our women and stand next to them and fight beside them. But you turn your women into whores and our women into cattle. We weep when our children are torn from us and we hide our children among the sheep, so that we may have them a little longer; but you raise your children like you raise cattle. You breed children from our women, and you sell them in the slave market to the highest bidder. You turn men into dogs, and send them into the arena to tear themselves to pieces for your pleasure, and as your noble Roman ladies watch us kill each other, they fondle dogs in their laps and feed them precious tidbits. What foul crew you are and what a filthy mess you have made of life! You have made a mockery of all men dream of, of the work of a man’s hands and the sweat of a man’s brow. Your own citizens live on the dole and spend their days in the circus and the arena. You have made a travesty of human life and robbed it of all its worth. You kill for the sake of killing, and your gentle amusement is towatch blood flow. You put little children into your mines and work them to death in a few months. And you have built your grandeur by being a thief to the whole world. Wellit is finished! Tell your Senate that it is all finished. That is the voice of the tool. Tell your Senate to send their armies against us, and we will destroy those armies as we have destroyed this one, and we will arm ourselves with the weapons of the armies you send against us. The whole world will hear the voice of the tool --- and to the slaves of the world, we will cry out, Rise up and cast off your chains! We will move through Italy, andwherever we go, the slaves will join us --- and then, one day, we will come against your eternal city. It will not be eternal then. Tell your Senate that. Tell them that we will let them know when we are coming. Then we will tear down the walls of Rome. Then we will come to the house where your Senate sits, and we will drag them out of their high and mighty seats, and we will tear off their robes so that they may stand naked and be judged as we have always been judged. But we will judge them fairly and we will hand them a full measure of justice. Every crime they have committed will be held against them, and they will make a full accounting. Tell them that, so that they may have time to prepare themselves to examine themselves. They will be called to bear witness, and we have long memories. Then, when justice has been done, we will build better cities, clean,beautiful cities without walls --- where mankind can live together in peace and in happiness. There is the whole message for the Senate. Bear it to them. Tell them that it comes from a slave called Spartacus . . .”24. Julius Caesara. Caesar in Gaulb. Caesar’s political ambitionsc. Caesar and the First Triumvirated. Caesar and “tyranny”e. Caesar and the poorf. Assassination of Caesar25. Augustus26. Roman Principate27. Roman defensive military posture28. pax romana29. aqueducts, roads, concrete, arches, vaults and domes30. Romanization31. Roman occupation of Judea32. Jesus33. Paul34. who was attracted to the message?35. spread of Christianity36. early persecution of Christians37. third-century crisis (235–284 C.E.)38. Diocletian (emperor from 284-305)39. Constantine (272-337 C.E.)40. Roman Christianity41. Han Dynasty (206 B.C.E. – 220 C.E.)a. “mandate of Heaven”b. “meet the new boss . . .” --- The masses had played a key role in the uprising. But they did not benefit from its outcome. The new empire was scarcely different from the old.” (Harman)Han Dynasty Map - (206 BC to 220 AD - 426 Years)42. Accomplishments of the Hana. Continuation of tight, centralized authority/administrationb. Tributary system on frontiersc. Han synthesisd. Promotion of Confucianism (academy), even selecting government officials by tests on Confucian literaturee. Extend and protect silk route to Roman dominated Mediterranean worldf. Expansion of empire to


Download Study Guide
Our administrator received your request to download this document. We will send you the file to your email shortly.
Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view Study Guide and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view Study Guide 2 2 and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?