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Blood Pathogen Housing

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Bloodborne Pathogen Training for Housing Maintenance (CA Code of Regulations, Title 8, Sec. 5193)Training ElementsOSHA’s Bloodborne Pathogen Standard Who is Covered by this Standard?Could You Contract a Bloodborne Pathogen Doing This at Work?Some Workers Who are at RiskPotential ExposureOther Potential ExposurePotential TransmissionBlood and Other Potentially Infectious MaterialsBloodborne PathogensHIVHIVHepatitisHepatitisExposure Control PlanExposure DeterminationEmployee Job AssignmentsUniversal PrecautionsEngineering and Work Practice ControlsEngineering ControlsWorkplace ControlHousekeeping PrecautionsHousekeeping PrecautionsLaundry PrecautionsFirst-Aid PrecautionsFirst-Aid PrecautionsProtective Clothing or EquipmentExamples of PPEDecontamination and DisposalAccident Clean-upBiohazard Warning LabelHepatitis B Vaccination RequirementsHepatitis B Vaccination RequirementsExposure IncidentWhat to do if an exposure occurs?Post-Exposure Follow-UpMedical Recordkeeping RequirementsTraining RequirementsTraining ElementsSummaryCase Study #1Case SummaryCase Study #2Case SummaryBloodborne Pathogen Training for Housing Maintenance (CA Code of Regulations, Title 8, Sec. 5193)Millie Tran and Sheryl MajorDepartment of Environmental Health and SafetySan Diego State UniversityTraining Elementsz Copy and Explanation of the BBP Standardz Epidemiology and Symptomsz Modes of Transmissionz Employer and Site-specific Exposure Control Planz Exposure Determinationz Hazard Recognition / Risk of Exposure / Identification of Exposure Situationz Use of Engineering Controls, Work Practices and Personal Protective Equipmentz Decontamination and Disposalz Hepatitis B Vaccination and Programz Emergency Reporting and Responsez Exposure Incidentz Post-Exposure Evaluation and Follow-upz Signs and Labelsz Live question and answer sessionsOSHA’s Bloodborne Pathogen Standard1) limits occupational exposure to blood and other potentially infectious materials since exposure could result in transmission of bloodborne pathogens that could lead to disease and death2) by protecting workers against this exposure3) thus reducing their risk from this exposureWho is Covered by this Standard?z All employees who could “reasonably anticipate” as the result of performing their job/duties contact blood and other potentially infectious materialsz “Good Samaritan” acts such as assisting a co-worker with a nosebleed would not be considered occupational exposureCould You Contract a Bloodborne Pathogen Doing This at Work?z Administering First-Aid?z Cleaning the restroom?z Using a tool covered with dried blood?z A co-worker sneezes on you?z Working in a sewer manhole?z Cleaning up after an accident?z Shaking a sick coworkers hand?z Cut yourself with glass that is contaminated with blood?Some Workers Who are at Riskz Physicians, nurses and emergency room personnelz Dentists and other dental workersz Laboratory and blood bank technologists and techniciansz Medical examinersz Morticiansz Law enforcement personnelz Firefightersz Paramedics and emergency medical techniciansz Anyone providing first-response medical carez Medical waste treatment employeesz Home healthcare workersz Orderlies, housekeeping personnel, and laundry workersPotential ExposureApproximately 5.6 million workers in health care and other facilities are at risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens.Other Potential Exposurez Industrial Accidentsz Administering First-Aidz Post Accident Clean-upz Janitorial or Maintenance WorkPotential Transmissionz Most common: needlesticksz Cuts from other contaminated sharps(scalpels, broken glass, etc.)z Contact of mucous membranes (for example, the eye, nose, mouth) or broken (cut or abraded) skinwith blood or other potentially infectious materialBlood and Other Potentially Infectious MaterialsBlood means:z Human blood, human blood components, and products made from human bloodOther Potentially Infectious Materialsz Human body fluids (cerebrospinal, peritoneal, synovial, pleural, pericardial, amniotic fluid, semen, vaginal secretions)z Other body fluid visibly contaminated with blood i.e. saliva, vomitusz All body fluids where it is difficult to differentiate between body fluids i.e. emergency response situationBloodborne PathogensPathogenic microorganisms that are present in human blood and can cause disease in humans.Bloodborne Pathogens include, but not limited to:z Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) ~ AIDSz Hepatitis B virus (HBV) ~ Hepatitis Bz Hepatitis C virus (HCV) ~ Hepatitis Cz Malariaz Syphilisz BrucellosisHIVz Source of virusz Blood, body fluids, breast milk z Route of Transmissionz Transfer or direct contact with infected body fluidsz Broken skin, mucous membranez HIV attacks the persons immune system and causes it to break down, making the person more susceptible to other diseases/virusesz HIV has a low survival rate outside of the bodyz Detection can be delayed due to HIV’s ability to integrate into the host DNA and remain inactivez CDC Report: Approximately 40,000 new HIV infections each year. Approximately over 1 million Americans are living with HIVHIVz Stages of Infectionz Category A = asymptomatic, virus is inactive, but presentz Category B = chronic yeast infections, shingles, thrush, feverz Category C = AIDS, TB infection, pneumonia, toxoplasmosis of the brainHepatitisz Inflammation of the liverz Chronic cases can lead to liver damage and liver failurez Symptoms include: jaundice, fatigue, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, intermittent nausea, vomitingz Detection can be delayed due to slow response of body to produce antibodies for the viruses z HBV can survive for at least one week in dried bloodz CDC Report: Approximately 60,000 new HBV infections each year. Approximately 1 million Americans are living with HBVz CDC Report: Approximately 26,000 new HCV infections each year. Approximately 3 million Americans are living with HCV.HepatitisHep A Hep B Hep C Hep D* Hep ESource of VirusFeces Blood/Body fluidsBlood/Body fluidsBlood/Body fluidsFecesRoute of TransmissionFecal- oralBroken skin, mucous membrane,Sexual contactBroken skin, mucous membraneBroken skin, mucous membraneFecal-oralChronic InfectionNo Yes Yes Yes NoPrevention Vaccine Vaccine Modified behaviorBlood screeningModified behaviorHBV vaccineEnsure safe drinking waterExposure Control Planz Identifies jobs and tasks where occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material occurs z Describes how the employer will:z


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