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UVM PSYC 104 - Syllabus

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TextbookClassical ConditioningClassical Conditioning Instrumental Conditioning & Aversive Stimulicatch-up & reviewFeb 18Neuroscience of Learning and Memory Neuroscience of Learning and Memory Feb 25Memory: Episodic and Semantic Brain Substrates Memory: Episodic and Semantic Brain SubstratesMemory: Episodic and Semantic Brain Substrates catch-up & reviewEXAM 2Mar 25Learning, Cognition & Behavior syllabus, page 1 Learning, Cognition & Behavior (PSYC 104) Spring 2009 Professor: John Green Dewey Hall 358 E-mail: [email protected] (SUBJECT LINE: Psych 104) Office hours: By appointment Graduate Teaching Assistant: Drina Vurbic E-mail: [email protected] (SUBJECT LINE: Psych 104) Office hours: By appointment Meeting Time & Location: Fleming 101 Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 10:40 am-11:30 am Prerequisite: General Psychology (PSYC 001) Course Description: This course will examine the behavioral and cognitive principles underlying learning, memory, and action inside and outside the laboratory. We will discuss conditioning, motivation, biological constraints, and mechanisms of remembering and forgetting. I’ll also throw in some neuroscience so we can think about how the nervous system accomplishes all of this. In General Psychology (PSYC 001), you learned the basics of this material in a section (Section III) entitled “Learning, Memory, Cognition”. In this part of the course, you read about learning (“classical conditioning”, “operant/instrumental conditioning”, and “cognitive learning”), memory (“remembering”, “factors influencing retrieval”, “biology and memory”, “forgetting”, and “improving memory”), and cognition (“imagery and concepts”, “decision making”, “problem solving”, “language”, and “intelligence”). This course will use what you learned in this section of PSYC 001 as a jumping-off point. I will re-introduce you to most of these concepts and attempt to deepen your knowledge of them. The background you gain in this course should provide good preparation for more specialized and advanced courses in Psychology, particularly Learning (PSYC 205), Motivation (PSYC 206), and Thinking (PSYC 207). One thing I want to emphasize from the start – we will be discussing both human and non-human animal data in terms of both learning and cognition. All too often, “cognition” is equated with human research and “learning” is equated with animal research. In fact, there is quite a bit of research on both “animal cognition” and “human learning”. I hope to interweave all of this to show you two things: (1) learning and cognition are intimately intertwined; and (2) fundamental principles of learning and cognition may not be so very different in humans and non-human animals. By the end of the course, I hope you will appreciate the depth and complexity of the science underlying what we know (or think we know!) about learning and cognition. Learning Goals: By the end of the course, students should understand the core concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in the experimental psychology of learning, memory, and cognition. Achievement of these goals will be demonstrated by performance on 4 exams. In addition, two research critiques will demonstrate understanding of empirical findings in the primary literature and how these findings relate to core concepts and theoretical perspectives in learning, memory, and cognition.Learning, Cognition & Behavior syllabus, page 2 Textbook: Gluck, M.A., Mercado, E., & Myers, C. E. (2008). Learning and Memory: From Brain to Behavior. New York, NY: Worth. Attendance: Attendance of lectures is highly encouraged, since I will be discussing material *not* on the Powerpoint slides that I post on Blackboard. Please be on time! Several times throughout the semester, at the beginning of class, I will take attendance. You will receive 5 pts of extra credit added to your point total for the course for no more than 1 absence during these attendance takings. If you are absent on more than 1 of these occasions, you will receive no extra credit points. Religious Holidays: Students have the right to practice the religion of their choice. Each semester students should submit in writing to their instructors by the end of the second full week of classes their documented religious holiday schedule for the semester. Faculty must permit students who miss work for the purpose of religious observance to make up this work. Special Needs & Health: For special needs, you can get information at www.uvm.edu/~access. For health-related issues, you can get information at www.uvm.edu/health. Accommodations for students with disabilities: If you have a disability for which you are or may be requesting accommodations, please contact UVM’s ACCESS Office (Accommodation, Consultation, Collaboration & Educational Support Services) by phone (656-7753) or email ([email protected]). That office will guide you through the processes that are required for accommodations to be made. Important Dates: The Add/Drop deadline is Monday, January 26. If you drop the course before this deadline, it will be removed from your transcript. The Withdrawal deadline is Monday, March 30. If you withdraw from the course before this deadline, it will remain on your transcript with a grade of ‘W’. Evaluation: Exam 1 – 20% 100 points Exam 2 – 20% 100 points Exam 3 – 20% 100 points Final Exam (cumulative) – 20% 100 points 2 Research Critiques – 20% 100 points (50 points each) 500 points General Grading Rubric: A = Outstanding. Not only clearly demonstrated hard work and effort, but also excellent grasp of important concepts and methods. B = Very good. Obvious hard work and effort, and solid grasp of important concepts and methods. C = Average. Work and effort adequate. Grasp of some concepts and methods but also some deficiencies. D = Below average. Not enough effort or not a well organized effort put in to trying to learn the material and convey that understanding. F = Poor. Little evidence of effort and/or any organization to effort. Lack of understanding of material. Exams: Exam format will be multiple-choice. Exams will cover lectures and assigned textbook (andLearning, Cognition & Behavior syllabus, page 3 handout) readings. Make-up exams must be arranged with the


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