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Appendix Flower Card_Descriptions

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Blue-Eyed Grass Sisyrinchium albidum (11) Blue-eyed grass is not a grass at all, but is in the Iris Family. This perennial plant grows 6 to 8 inches in height and the leaves are flat, narrow, long blades. The small blue flowers have three petals and three sepals that are almost identical. The flowers are borne near the top of the plant on slender stalks. It flowers from March to May and is found in Zone 2 and 3. Flower image contributed by: Darel Hess Gattinger’s Prairie Clover Dalea gattingeri (3) This plant is in the Bean or Pea Family. This low-growing plant has 5 to 7 leaflets which are fine, dense, and very pleasantly aromatic when crushed. The elongated cones of rose-purple flowers occur on the tips of wiry, reddish stems. It is in Zones 2 and 3. This is often a dominant ground cover and is endemic to the glades. It flowers from May to June. Flower image contributed by: Darel Hess Fame Flower Talinum calcaricum (16) Limestone Fame flower is in the Purslane Family. This miniature perennial (4 to 6 in tall) is easily overlooked even though it may occur in large numbers. The curved, cylindrical in shape leaves are only ¾ inch long. The flowers, with bright purplish petals, are borne in small clusters at the top of slender stems and are only ½ inch wide. The flowers only open a few hours each afternoon. It was described as a new species in 1967 (endemic) and found in Zone 2. It blooms from May to August. Flower image contributed by: Darel Hess Gattinger’s Lobelia Lobelia gattingeri (15) This plant is in the Bell Flower Family. It is named in honor of the pioneer Tennessee botanist, Dr. Augustin Gattinger. This is a small annual plant (6 to 12 inches tall) with unbranched stems. The leaves clasp the base of the stem. The flowers are on the top portion of the stem and are attached to the stem. The flowers are blue-purple, about ½ inch long or less in size. This plant is endemic to the glades and is found in Zone 2. It blooms from May to June. Flower image contributed by: Darel Hess Prickly-Pear Cactus Opuntia humifusa (9) This perennial plant is in the Cactus Family. It is the only native cactus in Tennessee. The flattened green stems (pads) are specialized for water storage and photosynthesis. The spines are really greatly reduced leaves. The plants can grow and spread out to be 2 to 3 feet wide in a cluster, but the plant is only 8 inches tall. The plant produces large, yellow flowers with red centers from May to June. It is found in Zones 2 and 3. Flower image contributed by: Darel Hess Glade Sandwort Arenaria patula (7) Glade sandwort is in the Pink Family. The annual plant is also known as Wild Baby’s Breath. A small annual 3 to 6 inches tall, it has thin, linear leaves. The white petals are notched and about ½ inch long. This tiny plant is common in limestone soils and flowers from April to June in Zone 2. Flower image contributed by: Darel HessGlade Savory Satureja glabella (25) This perennial is a member of the Mint Family. This perennial is only 3 to 4 inches tall. The flower is small and delicate with a prominent calyx (tube) and dark purple spots on the corolla (petals). The leaves are smooth (glabella means smooth). It is found in limestone soils and is endemic to the Interior Low Plateau. It is found in Zone 3 (grassy glades) and flowers June to August. The well known herb, basil, is in this same genus. A useful way to identify members of the Mint Family is to check the stem, most have square stems. Flower image contributed by: Darel Hess Nashville Breadroot Pediomelium subacaulis (6) This plant is in the Bean or Pea Family. This showy wildflower is about 6 inches tall and is easily identified by its palmately compound leaves (think of the palm of your hand) and dense spectacular cluster of purplish-blue flowers. Endemic to the glades, it is found in Zone 3. It is called Breadroot because it has a large tuber at the end of a thin root which is very starchy and may have been used by Native Americans for food. It flowers from April to May. Flower image contributed by: Darel Hess Missouri Evening Primrose Oenothera macrocarpa (1) This showy, low-sprawling perennial plant is from the Evening Primrose Family. It has flowers that may measure up to 5 inches across. Leaves are narrow and may grow up to 6 inches long. They often have a silvery look because of the numerous tiny hairs. Blooms may be seen in late spring (May to June). Seed pods are up to 3 inches long with four wing-like parts. It is found in Zone 2 of cedar glades. East of the Mississippi River, it is found only in Rutherford County, Tennessee. Flower image contributed by: Darel Hess Price’s Wood Sorrel Oxalis priceae (22) A member of the Wood Sorrel Family, this perennial has leaves typical of the genus (resemble showy clover leaves). The flowers are yellow with red spots at the base of the petals; they are ½ inch wide. This plant is endemic to cedar glades and is found in Zone 2. The genus name indicates the presence of oxalic acid, which makes the shamrock –shaped leaves taste sour. It flowers April to May. Flower image contributed by: Darel Hess Stonecrop Sedum pulchellum (27) Known as Limestone Stonecrop, this annual plant is a member of the Orpine Family. This is a low growing plant (3 inches tall) with succulent leaves. The tiny white-to-pink flowers are arranged on 3 to 7 curved branches. The leaves are narrow (1/4 inch wide) and cylindrical. The plants form a mat on thin soil over limestone rock. It is found in Zone 2 and flowers from May to June. Flower image contributed by: Darel Hess Sunnybell Lily Schoenolirion croceum (19) This plant is in the Lily Family. The flower has beautiful yellow petals and green leaves coming from the base of the plant. The leaves are 15-24 inches long. It is found in Zones 2 and 3, always near water that stands in spring. It is an endangered plant and protected by state law.


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