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Becoming Herodotus

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Becoming Herodotus | http://www.coastal.edu/ashes2art 1Content Area: : Visual Arts Grades: 9-12 AdvancedObjectives: The student will: 1. Review the histories of Herodotus and choose one avenue of the histories pertaining to Delphi to investigate further. (Nat. Standards: III C., IV A., IV B., IV C.,) Assessment: Planning worksheet2. Research his/her chosen topic in depth and develop either a literary, or visual response that is well researched. (Nat. Standards: I B., Advanced: I C., I D. ) Assessment: Rubric3. Execute his/her response to the research in a manner that is clear and well developed. Visual responses should be well crafted and related to student’s research. Responses should be thoroughly researched and sources should be correctly sited using MLA format. (Nat. Standards: VI A., VI B., Advanced: V D., VI C.,) Assessment: Rubric4. Present research findings and response to class. (Nat. Standards: IV A., IV C., ) Assessment: RubricTime: (45 minute class periods) • 1 class for introduction of Herodotus, lesson, and Ashes2Art website • 3-4 classes for independent research • 3-4 classes for preparation of response • 1-2 classes for class presentationsTask Description: Students are to be introduced to the life and histories of Herodotus, giving specific attention to his recollections of Delphi. Students are to select and research one aspect of the histories of Herodotus and his descriptions of Delphi and record their findings either by writing a reflection paper and recorded history of their own or developing a visual arts piece that serves as a response or reflection of their research. The Student will present his/her research findings and response to the class. Students are encouraged to use the Ashes2Art website, as well as the list of provided resources that accompany this lesson. Background or Instructional Context/Curriculum Connections: “Becoming Herodotus” is a research-based lesson that encourages students to respond to their findings in a visual or literary way. Because of these possibilities, several content areas are addressed. Visual arts, history, and language arts play a dominant role in this lesson with art history and social studies also present. The national standards addressed for “Becoming Herodotus” are Visual Arts standards, however, this lesson can be easily adapted to a history, language arts, or social studies classroom. The Attachments to this Lesson Include: • Defining your Research worksheet • Suggestions for guided research • Who is Herodotus? Handout • List of resource material • RubricBecoming HerodotusBecoming Herodotus | http://www.coastal.edu/ashes2art 2Materials and Tools: • 1 Herodotus handout per student• 1 Computer per student • 1 Guided Research worksheet per student• Various books and resource material pertaining to Herodotus and Delphi• Art supplies as needed for students to create visual responseVisuals and Resources: Ashes 2 Art website: www.coastal.edu/ashes2art Stevenson, Daniel C. “The History of Herodotus by Herodotus.” The Internet Classics Archives. 1994. Web Atomics. 04 Oct. 2000. http://classics.mit.edu/Herodotus/history.html (Translated by George Rawlinson) Books: Porter, John. “Herodotus.” University of Saskatchewan. 11 Oct. 2007 http://homepage.usask.ca/~jrp638/CourseNotes/HdtNotes.html#achievement Pedley, John. Sanctuaries and the Sacred in the Ancient Greek World. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005. Author not available, HERODOTUS. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition New York: Columbia University Press 2007.Becoming Herodotus | http://www.coastal.edu/ashes2art 3National Standards: I. Understanding and applying media techniques and processes: B. Students conceive and create works of visual art that demonstrate an understanding of how the communication of their ideas relates to the media, techniques, and processes they use. Advanced: C. Students communicate ideas regularly at a high level of effectiveness in at least one visual arts mediumD. Students initiate, define, and solve challenging visual arts problems independently using intellectual skills such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation.III. Choosing and evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas: C. Students describe the origins of specific images and ideas and explain why they are of value in their artwork and in the work of others.IV. Understanding the visual arts in relation to history and cultures: A. Students differentiate among a variety of historical and cultural contexts in terms of characteristics and purposes of works of art. B. Students describe the function and explore the meaning of specific art objects within varied cultures, times, and places. C. Students analyze relationship of works of art to one another in terms of history, aesthetics, and culture, justifying conclusions made in the analysis and using such conclusions to inform their own art making. V. Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others: Advanced: D. Students correlate responses to works of visual art with various techniques for communicating meanings, ideas, attitudes, views, and intentions.VI. Making connections between Visual Arts and other Disciplines. A. Students compare the materials, technologies, media and process of the visual arts with those of other arts disciplines as they are used in creation and types of analysis. B. Students compare characteristics of visual arts within a particular historical period or style with ideas, issues, or themes in the humanities or sciences. Advanced: C. Students synthesize the creative and analytical principles and techniques of the visual arts and selected other arts disciplines, the humanities, or the sciences.Becoming Herodotus | http://www.coastal.edu/ashes2art 4Procedures: 1. Students are introduced to the histories of Herodotus through lecture and class discussion. 2. Give students “Who is Herodotus?” handout and discuss the influence Herodotus has had on Western history. 3. Introduce students to the lesson: Explain that this is a research based lesson that involves a visual or


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