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Integrated System SolutionsPowerPoint PresentationSlide 3Slide 4Technological BarriersScience BarriersSocial – Management BarriersCommunity EngagementLevels of participationCommunity EngagementPrinciples of Community Engagement (derived from with some additions from www.cdc.gov/phppo/)NewDISS “Petri Dish” with Generic Federation MappingSlide 13Slide 14Technology Infusion Scenarios - for SEEDS working group Based on REASoN project: Systems Integration and Visualization of Yellowstone Fred Watson (PI) California State University Monterey Bay. March 17th 2004. ©Slide 16SEEDS IT Vision Scenario: Smoke Impact REASoN Project: Application of NASA ESE Data and Tools to Particulate Air Quality Management (PPT/PDF)Smoke Scenario: IT needs and CapabilitiesProject Domain, New Technologies and BarriersData Flow & Processing in AQ ManagementA Wrapper Service: TOMS Satellite Image DataGeneric Data Flow and Processing for BrowsingService Oriented Architecture: Data AND Services are DistributedAn Application Program: Voyager Data Browser1Integrated System SolutionsValue & benefits to citizens and societyDataPolicy DecisionsManagementDecisionsPredictionsObservationsHigh Performance Computing,Communication, & VisualizationDecisionSupport Tools-Assessments w/ dynamic scenario ability-Decision Support SystemsMonitoring & Measurements-Satellite- Airborne- in situScience Models- Oceans - Ice- Land - Coupled- AtmosphereInputs Outputs Outcomes ImpactsStandards & Interoperability2 Retrospective AnalysisMonth, YearsNOW Analysis, DaysPredictive Analysis, Days-YearsData Sources and TypesAll the real time data + NPS IMPROVE Aerosol Chemistry.EPA PM2.5 Mass, NWS Visibility, WEBCAMs, NASA MODIS, GOES, TOMSNAAPS MODEL ForecastNOAA/EPA, NASA, CMAQData Analysis Tools and MethodsFull chemical model simulationsDiagnostic and inverse modelingSpatio-temporal overlaysMulti-sensory data interrogationBack & forward trajectories, CATTEmission and met. forecastsFull chemical modelData assimilationParcel tagging, trackingCommunication Collaboration and Coordination MethodsTech reports reg. SupportPeer reviewed scientificAnalyst and managers consolesOpen inclusive communicationsData Assimilation methodsOpen, public forecastsModel-data comparisonModeler-data analyst comm.Analysis Products Quantitative natural aerosol concentrationCurrent aerosol patternEvolving event summaryFuture natural emissionsSimulated conc. patternFuture location of high conc.Decision Support Jurisdiction: natural/manmade State Implementation Plans, (SIP), PM/Haze Criteria Documents, RegsJurisdiction: natural/manmadeTriggers for management actionPublic information and decisionsStatutory and policy changes Management action triggersProgress tracking3a)b)AirQualityAssessmentCompare to GoalsPlan ReductionsTrack ProgressControls (Actions)Monitoring(Sensing)Set GoalsNAAQSAssessment turns data into knowledge for decision making & actions through analysis (science & engineering)Monitoring collects multi-sensory data from surface and satellite platforms and Set PolicyCAAAPM Policy decisionsIs intercontinental long range transport (LRT) of PM significant?PM Regulator decisionsWhat are the PM concentrations; role of LRT; how to control?PM Implementation and Operation decisionsSpecific local and distant source attribution; State Implementation Plan (SIP) for PM; PM forecasting; health alertsImplementation & OperationRegulatoryPolicyImplementation & OperationRegulatoryPolicyHighly reduced, filtered, aggregated ‘knowledge’Analyzed quantitative data on PM pattern, exceedances Considerable raw data, model input, verificationLong decision time frameIntermediate to long decision time frameIntermediate andshort decision time frame4Information ‘Refinery’ Value Chain (Taylor, 1975)•Informing KnowledgeActionProductive KnowledgeInformationDataOrganizingGrouping Classifying Formatting DisplayingAnalyzingSeparatingEvaluating Interpreting SynthesizingJudging Options Quality Advantages DisadvantagesDeciding Matching goals, Compromising Bargaining Decidinge.g. CIRA VIEWSe.g. Langley IDEARAW Systeme.g. WG Summary Rpte.g. RPO Manager5Technological BarriersFinding AccessingTransformingFusing6Science BarriersThe science of satellite data use is poor7Social – Management BarriersPoor community engagementData and tool reuse sharingSupply (type of info) does not match demand8Community EngagementJohn TownshendUniversity of MarylandSEEDS Workshop Recommendation:It should be the highest priority for the current Formulation Team of the SEEDS project to develop and implement organizational structures facilitating much deeper engagement of key stakeholders. This action itself must involve some of these stakeholders and should start immediately.The success of SEEDS will strongly depend on the degree to which we engage all the communities supplying, analyzing, adding value and using NASA’s ESE productsBenefits of CEBenefits of CE9Levels of participationLowHighDeep InvolvementCommunity EngagementParticipationAwareness OwnershipCommunity Involvement10Community EngagementCommunity engagement is a process, not a program. It is the participation of members of a community in assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating solutions to problems that affect them. As such, community engagement involves interpersonal trust, communication, and collaboration. Such engagement, or participation, should focus on, and result from, the needs, expectations, and desires of a community's members.11Principles of Community Engagement(derived from with some additions from www.cdc.gov/phppo/)1.Be clear about the purposes or goals of the engagement effort, and the populations and/or communities you want to engage. The implementers of the engagement process need to be able to communicate to the community why participation is worthwhile. 2.Become knowledgeable about the community in terms of its economic conditions, political structures, norms and values, demographic trends, history, and experience with engagement efforts. Learn about the community's perceptions of those initiating the engagement activities. It is important to learn as much about the community as possible, through both qualitative and quantitative methods from as many sources as feasible. 3.Go into the community, establish relationships, build trust, work with the formal and informal leadership, and seek commitment from community organizations and leaders to create processes for mobilizing the community.


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