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Yale ENGL 125 - Syllabus

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Prof. Pericles [email protected] 23, 2003Syllabus English 125b, Section 5Major English Poets: Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, Yeats, Eliot TextsJohn Milton, Paradise Lost, ed. Elledge (Norton)Alexander Pope, Poetry and Prose of Alexander Pope, ed. Williams (Riverside)William Wordsworth, Selected Poems and Prefaces, ed. Stillinger (Riverside)W. B. Yeats, Collected Poems, ed. Finneran (Scribner) T. S. Eliot, “The Waste Land” and Other Poems, ed. Kermode (Penguin)Paul Fussell, Poetic Meter and Poetic Form (McGraw-Hill)M. H. Abrams, A Glossary of Literary Terms (Heinle) Texts are available at Book Haven, 290 York St.You will also need to make use of the Oxford English Dictionary, available in CCL and SML reference or online (http://dictionary.oed.com/). Class TimeMW 2:30-3:45. Please come on time. More than four unexcused absences will result in a failinggrade for the course. Office HoursTh 2:00-3:45 and other times by appointment, 451 College Street, Room 102. I encourage all students to come meet with me during the process of writing papers for the course. In order to be sure of having enough time to talk, please schedule an appointment by calling Mary Jane Stevens at 432-4750. Discussion QuestionsEach student is responsible for submitting discussion questions or comments to the on-line forumevery two weeks. The class will be divided into four groups (A to D). The list of readings on pp.3-4 below indicates which group is responsible for discussion questions for each day. You may submit your questions on the poet under discussion for your day anytime in the two weeks prior to the day for which you are responsible, but no later than noon on that day. Questions can focus on aspects of the reading that you did not understand, or on connections between the reading and previous discussions in class. They should be designed to stimulate discussion. Comments should offer substantive responses to other students’ questions or a continuation of discussion from class. Each student is responsible for six sets of questions or comments during the semester. If you fail to submit questions or comments on more than one of those six occasions, your grade may be affected. To use the on-line forum, go to the classes server (classes.yale.edu), sign in, locate this course on your classes list, and click “Forum” at the bottom of the page.Other Course RequirementsRegular attendance at class and participation in class discussions. Attendance at the four plenary lectures. Memorization of at least twenty lines each of at least two poems, to be recited at various times during the semester.Four essays (5 to 7 pages), due February 6, February 27, March 26, and April 23.Note: at least one of these essays must engage with either a prose work by the poet under consideration or an essay by a modern critic. Assignments that can fulfill this requirement will be given as optional paper topics.Final exam, May 9. Papers can be submitted at the drop-box outside the English department office (room 109, Linsly-Chittenden Hall), with my name clearly indicated on the front page, or at my office (room 102,451 College Street). You may also submit your papers electronically, as Word attachments to an email ([email protected]). Late papers will be penalized unless accompanied by a Dean’s excuse. GradesGrade for participation in class, attendance, participation in on-line forum: 15%Each of four papers: 15%Final exam: 25%You must complete all assignments to earn a passing grade in this class.Format of Papers; PlagiarismConsult “Some Matters of Form” and Professor Miller’s addendum “Quoting Poetry” for guidelines about how to format your papers. These documents will be distributed in class. Your assignments must be typed in 12-point font, with margins of one inch. We will discuss plagiarism before you hand in your first papers. You should document all your sources for any ideas or information if you are unsure whether they originated with you. (This includes any information you find on the web). Yale College regulations require that I report all cases of plagiarism to the Yale College Executive Committee. You can find further information in a pamphlet entitled “Sources: Their Use and Acknowledgment,” which you should have received from the Yale College Dean’s Office. It is available at http://www.dartmouth.edu/~sources/. ReadingsIn most weeks, the number of pages is not great, but the reading is difficult, and you should plan to read each selection slowly and carefully at least twice. In addition to the poetry, you are required to read: essays by William Wordsworth, T. S. Eliot, William Empson, and Helen Vendler; Poetic Meter and Poetic Form by Paul Fussell; and excerpts of A Glossary of Literary Terms by M. H. Abrams. The latter text is quite expensive, and the excerpts are short, so it should be feasible to share a copy with a classmate. I also encourage you to make use of the helpful introductions, notes, sources, and criticism included in many of the editions we are using.Readings, lectures, and other assignments are listed by date on the following two pages. JanuaryM 12 Milton, Sonnet 19 (393), Paradise Lost, Book 1 (6-32)W 14 Note “On the Verse”; PL 1-2 (6-63);Fussell, “The Nature of Meter” (3-16); Abrams, “Allegory” (5-8), “Blank Verse” (24-5), “Epic” (76-80), “Renaissance” (264-8)F 16 PL 2 (32-63) [A] M 19 MLK day; no class W 21 PL 3-4 (63-112); William Empson, “Milton’s God” (605-16) [B]W 21 4:00 p.m., plenary lecture on Milton, Prof. Blair Hoxby M 26 PL 5-6 (112-62); Fussell, “The Technique of Scansion” (17-29) [C]W 28 PL 7-8 (162-97) [D]W 28 3:45 p.m., opportunity to recite a passage from Milton FebruaryM 2 PL 9-10 (197-259) [A]W 4 PL 11-12 (259-301) [B]F 6 First paper due (on Milton) M 9 Alexander Pope, “The Rape of the Lock” (78-100); Abrams, “Burlesque” (26-8), “Neclassic and Romantic” (174-80), “Rhetorical Figures” (270-73) [C]W 11 Pope, “An Essay on Criticism” (37-57); Fussell, “Metrical Variations” (30-61); Abrams, “Essay” (82-3), “Onomatopeia” (199-200) [D]W 11 3:45 p.m., opportunity to recite a passage from Pope M


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