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Concept Selection

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Concept SelectionAgendaReferencesConcept SelectionConcept Selection (Cont.)Slide 6Slide 7Slide 8Slide 9Stuart Pugh’s PerspectiveStuart Pugh’s Perspective (Cont.)Slide 12Overview of the Concept Selection MethodologyOverview of the Concept Selection Methodology (Cont.)Slide 15Slide 16Slide 17Slide 18Slide 19Concept ScreeningThe ConceptsSlide 221. Prepare the Selection Matrix1. Prepare the Selection Matrix (Cont.)Slide 25Slide 261. Prepare the Selection Matrix Selection Criteria for the SyringeSlide 282. Rate the Concepts2. Rate the Concepts (Cont.)2. Rate the Concepts Syringe ExampleSlide 323. Rank the Concepts3. Rank the Concepts (Cont.)3. Rank the Concepts Syringe ExampleSlide 364. Combine and Improve the Concepts4. Combine and Improve the Concepts Syringe ExampleSlide 39Slide 405. Select One or More Concepts5. Select One or More Concepts Syringe ExampleConcept ScoringSlide 441. Prepare the Selection Matrix (Cont.)Slide 46Slide 47Slide 48Slide 49Slide 50Slide 51Slide 52Slide 535. Select One or More Concepts (Cont.)Slide 55Concept Scoring Syringe ExampleSlide 57Final Remarks on Concept Generation and Selection1Concept Selection Concept SelectionJonathan WeaverUDM ME Department2Concept SelectionAgenda•Concept Selection.•Stuart Pugh’s Perspective.•Overview of the Concept Selection Methodology.•Concept Screening.•Concept Scoring.3Concept SelectionReferencesKarl T. Ulrich & Steven D. Eppinger: Product Design and Development. Second Edition. McGraw-Hill, 2000.Ullman, David G.: The Mechanical Design Process. Second Edition. McGraw-Hill, 1997.Pugh, Stuart: Creating Innovative Products Using Total Design. Addison-Wesley Publishing Co., 1996.4Concept SelectionConcept SelectionConcept DevelopmentSystem-Level DesignDetail DesignTesting and RefinementProduction Ramp-UpProduct LaunchMission StatementA Generic Product Development Process5Concept SelectionConcept Selection (Cont.)EstablishTargetSpecificationsIdentifyCustomerNeedsAnalyzeCompetitiveProductsGenerateProductConceptsSelect aProductConceptSet Final SpecificationsPlan RemainingDevelopment ProjectPerformEconomicAnalysisMission StatementDevelopment PlanThe Concept Development Phase6Concept SelectionConcept Selection (Cont.)•Concept selection is the process of evaluating concepts with respect to the customer needs and other criteria, comparing the relative strengths and weaknesses of the concepts, and selecting one or more concepts for further investigation.•We will focus here on the selection of an overall product concept. However, the method presented can also be used later in the development process when the team must select sub-system concepts, components, and production processes.7Concept SelectionConcept Selection (Cont.)•Although concept selection is ultimately a convergent process, it is frequently an iterative convergent-divergent process and may not produce a dominant concept immediately.–A large set of concepts is initially windowed down to a smaller set, but these concepts may subsequently be combined and improved to temporarily enlarge the set of concepts under consideration.–Through several iterations a dominant concept is finally chosen.8Concept SelectionConcept Selection (Cont.)•All teams use some method for choosing a concept.•The methods vary in their effectiveness and include the following:–External decision.–Product champion.–Intuition.–Multivoting.–Pros and cons.–Prototype and test.–Decision matrices.9Concept SelectionConcept Selection (Cont.)•A structured method offers several benefits:–A customer-focused product.–A competitive design.–Better product-process coordination.–Reduced time to product introduction.–Effective group decision making.–Documentation of the decision process.–Better team buy-in on the decision.10Concept SelectionStuart Pugh’s Perspective•“One thing is certain: It is extremely easy to select the wrong concept and difficult to select the best one. If the wrong one is chosen, the design may be said to suffer from conceptual weakness, and the design may be said to be conceptually vulnerable.”•“Conceptual weakness in any design usually manifests itself in two ways:11Concept SelectionStuart Pugh’s Perspective (Cont.)–The final chosen concept is weak due to lack of thoroughness in conceptual approach. Thereafter, no amount of attention to detail requirements, technical requirements, and the like will recoup the situation.–The final chosen concept is strong and the best possible within the constraints, but, due to lack of thoroughness in conceptual approach and selection, alternatives suggested, say, by others, cannot be refuted by sound technical argument and debate. In other words, the concept is the best available, it is strong, but the reasons for its strength are not known or fully understood.”12Concept SelectionStuart Pugh’s Perspective (Cont.)•“So here we have, by definition, two cases of conceptual weakness – the former being truly weak, the latter being strong but lacking thoroughness in approach and apparently weak.”•“Bear in mind that in the absolute sense it is impossible to evolve and evaluate all possible solutions to a particular problem. In order to minimize the possibility of the wrong choice of concept, it becomes essential to carry out concept formulation and evaluation in a progressive and disciplined manner.”13Concept SelectionOverview of the Concept Selection Methodology•We will consider here a two-stage concept selection methodology, although the first stage may suffice for simple design decisions.•The first stage is called concept screening and the second stage is called concept scoring.•Each stage is supported by a decision matrix which is used by the team to rate, rank, and select the best concept(s).14Concept SelectionOverview of the Concept Selection Methodology (Cont.)•Concept screening:–The method that we are going to use was developed by Stuart Pugh in the 1980s and is often called the Pugh Concept Selection Method.–It is a quick, approximate evaluation aimed at producing a few viable alternatives. •Concept scoring:–It is a more careful analysis of these relatively few concepts in order to choose the single concept most likely to lead to product success.15Concept SelectionOverview of the Concept Selection Methodology (Cont.)•During the concept screening stage, rough initial concepts are evaluated relative to a common reference concept using the concept


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