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Photography Safety Manual

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Photography Safety Manual Poison Control: 1-800-222-1222 HACC Security/Emergency number: 780-2568 HACC Department of Environmental Health and Safety 221.1300 x:1567 If the emergency is life threatening call 911, or ask a professor or secretary to call. Chemicals enter the body through the skin, inhalation and ingestion. Smoking increases the hazards of respiratory reactions. Art materials may be: Toxic, cause physical injury via breathing (inhalation), eating (ingestion), or by skin contact & absorption Caustic, may burn you on contact Irritant, cause skin, eye, mucous membrane inflammation or pain Flammable, can ignite or be set on fire Explosive, may explode when exposed to heat, pressure or shock GENERAL PRECAUTIONS: Do not eat or drink close to work area (to prevent accidental ingestion) Familiarize yourself with substances that are hazardous Clean hands thoroughly after working using soap and water Keep work area clean and organized Ask your doctor if you are taking medication or are pregnant about what precautions you should be taking Identify location of fire extinguishers, first aid box and eye wash stations (ask your professor if need be) Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are available at https://myhacc.hacc.edu/cp/home/displaylogin or contact the Department of Environmental Health and Safety at 221.1300 x:1567.QUICK OVERVIEW OF HAZARDS Developers - Hydroquinone, monomethyl-p-aminophenol sulfate, alkalis Stop Baths - Acetic acid Fixers - Sulfur dioxide Intensifiers - Dichromates, hydrochloric acid (not used in HACC darkroom) Toners - Selenium compounds, hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide Color Processes - Formaldehyde, solvents, developers PRECAUTIONS First Aid kits are located in the Finishing Room & Film Developing Room. NO EATING OR DRINKING IN THE STUDIOS. Guests must be approved in advance by the instructor. No children under 12 are permitted in the darkrooms. Pregnant women should avoid toning, color chemicals, intensifying, or mixing powders, and should always consult with their doctor first. Asthmatics are especially sensitive to fixing baths. No glass thermometers allowed in the facility. Never use unfamiliar chemicals. Start with liquid chemistry instead of powders, as is done at HACC. Report all accidents and reactions to your instructor. Faculty member or student assistant must be present when a student is using the facility. Notify your professor about any health condition or medication that may affect you in the classroom. Digital Photography Digital photography generally has fewer hazards associated with it than darkroom processes which involve many chemicals. Nevertheless, students should be aware of certain hazards. HAZARDS Musculoskeletal problems, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, make occur. Eye strain and dry eyes may occur from staring at the computer monitor. Working for more than 4 hours a day, even with breaks, is considered hazardous. PRECAUTIONS Vision - Reduce glare, dim room lights (to about one half of that required for normal work), use glare-reducing screens, place terminals to right angles to windows and take regular rest breaks.Ergonomics - Adjust screen, keyboard, table and chair so that body parts are in the neutral position with head erect and eyes forward, shoulders not elevated, upper arms vertical with elbows at sides, forearms are horizontal, wrists are straight, back retains natural S curve, legs are bent at 90 degrees, and there is clearance between knees and the work surface. Take frequent rest breaks. 18-24 inches is the recommended viewing distance. Eyes should be level with the top of the monitor. Black and White Photo-processing A wide variety of chemicals are used in black and white photographic processing. Film developing is usually done in closed canisters. Print processing uses tray processing, with successive developing baths, stop baths, fixing baths, and rinse steps. Other treatments include use of hardeners, intensifiers, reducers, toners, and hypo eliminators. HACC uses photo-chemicals in liquid form only, which only need diluting. Powder form, which need dissolving and diluting, is more hazardous. HAZARDS Developer solutions and powders are often highly alkaline, and glacial acetic acid, used in making the stop bath, is also corrosive by skin contact, inhalation and ingestion. Developer powders are highly toxic by inhalation, and moderately toxic by skin contact, due to the alkali and developers themselves (see Developing Baths below). PRECAUTIONS Use liquid chemistry whenever possible. Wear gloves, goggles and protective apron when mixing concentrated photo-chemicals. Always add any acid to water, never the reverse. In case of skin contact, rinse with lots of water. In case of eye contact, rinse for at least 15-20 minutes, preferably using an eyewash station, seek medical attention. Store concentrated acids and other corrosive chemicals on low shelves so as to reduce the chance of face or eye damage in case of breakage and splashing. Do not store photographic solutions in glass containers DEVELOPING BATHS The most commonly used developers are hydroquinone, monomethyl para-amino phenol sulfate, and phenidone. Several other developers are used for special purposes. Other common components of developing baths include an accelerator, often sodium carbonate or borax, sodium sulfite as a preservative, and potassium bromide as a restrainer or antifogging agent. HAZARDSDevelopers are skin and eye irritants, and in many cases strong sensitizers. Monomethyl-p-aminophenol sulfate creates many skin problems, and allergies to it are frequent (although this is thought to be due to the presence of para-phenylene diamine as a contaminant). Hydroquinone can cause depigmentation and eye injury after five or more years of repeated exposure, and is a mutagen. Some developers also can be absorbed through the skin to cause severe poisoning (e.g., catechol, pyrogallic acid). Phenidone is only slightly toxic by skin contact. Most developers are moderately to highly toxic by ingestion, with ingestion of less than one tablespoon of compounds such as monomethyl-p-aminophenol sulfate, hydroquinone, or pyrocatechol being possibly fatal for adults. Symptoms include ringing in the ears (tinnitus), nausea, dizziness, muscular twitching, increased respiration, headache, cyanosis (turning blue from lack of oxygen) due to methemoglobinemia, delirium, and coma. With some developers, convulsions also can occur.


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