New version page

immigration_unit

Upgrade to remove ads

This preview shows page 1-2-19-20 out of 20 pages.

Save
View Full Document
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 20 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 20 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 20 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 20 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience

Upgrade to remove ads
Unformatted text preview:

Immigration Unit Overview Immigration to the United States. The United States is known as a nation of immigrants. Possessing the world’s third largest population of nearly 300 million people, the U.S. is inhabited overwhelmingly by the direct descendants of immigrants. From 1820 to 1930, the United States received about 60 percent of the world’s immigrants. Approximately 65 million people have migrated to the United States since 1820. This module contains two interrelated parts. In Activity 1 students examine patterns of immigration over time. In Activity 2 students examine the movement of migrants between Europe and the United States. Activity 1: Immigration to the United States—Patterns of Immigration Over Time. Overview The United States has experienced two significant waves of immigration. In the first wave (1600-1949), approximately 90 percent of the immigrants to the U.S. came from Europe. Three distinctive peaks of European immigration characterize this first wave. Western Europeans dominated immigration up until the Civil War (1861-1865). Immigration declined during the Civil War but rose during the 1880s when three-quarters of the immigrants came from Northern and Western Europe. Immigrants from this period of time are sometimes referred to as “old immigrants.” Economic problems in the United States discouraged immigration during the early 1890s. The third peak occurred from the late 1890s to the early 20th century when Southern and Eastern European immigrants came in large numbers to the United States. In 1907, a record 1.3 million immigrants entered the United States. The immigrants from the third peak are sometimes referred to as “new immigrants.” Latin America and Asia are the source of 75 percent of migration to the U.S. during the second wave (1950 to the present). This shift in the source of migrants, from mostly Europe to Asia and Latin America, has occurred, for the most part, in the last 40 years. Correlation to Advanced Placement Human Geography II. Population: C. Population Movement Together, these lessons examine migration at a range of scales to help students develop a sense of, “how events and processes at different scales influence one another” (Human Geography Course Description 2007, 4). Time Required Two Class Periods Materials • Handout 1: Immigration Pre-Test, one per student • Handout 2: Table 1, Immigration Volume and Rates, one per student • Handout 3: Matching Activity, one per student• Handout 4: Table 1 A, Immigration Volume and Rates showing the nations/regions, one per student or group or an overhead transparency • Handout 5: Map of Europe • Handout 6: Map of World • Handout 7: Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Immigration • Handout 8: Cartoon: Looking Backward Classroom Procedures Beginning the Activity 1. Administer the Immigration Pre-Test (Handout 1) to assess student understanding of when and from where groups of immigrants came to the United States and to act as a preview for the coming activity. Encourage students to speculate if they are unsure of the answers. Have them share their responses in small groups. Answers to the Immigration Pre-Test include: 1. Northern and Western Europe 2. Southern and Eastern Europe 3. Asia and Latin America 4. Germany 5. Mexico Let students know that they will be learning more about immigration to the United States through this activity. Developing the Activity 2. Distribute and review Table 1, Immigration Volume and Rates (Handout 2). The table shows the number and place of origin of U.S. immigrants by time period (Column 1). Column 2 contains the average yearly total of all immigrants to the United States. No accurate information is available for the time periods between 1630 and 1819. Column 3 indicates the number of immigrants per 1000 of the US population. For example, between 1820 and 1831, for every 1000 resident Americans, there were 1.3 immigrants. In contrast, in 1998, there were 3.6 immigrants per 1000 Americans. Be sure students note both the absolute number of immigrants shown in Column 2 as well as the ratio of immigrants to residents. Columns 4 through 14, labeled Percent of Average Yearly Total, represent the average yearly total immigration to the United States by nation/region at various time periods. 3. When you are satisfied that students understand the table, have them work individually to speculate which column represents each country/region. For example, which nation is represented in Column 4, Number 1? (Great Britain) Distribute, the Matching Activity (Handout 3), and instruct students to read the directions and complete it. Students should be able to make decisions by analyzing the table and applying previous knowledge about immigration patterns and European history. Limit the amount of time students have to work on this. 4. Place students in small groups and have them share their initial answers. Give them time to reach consensus on what they think are the correct answers. Instruct each group to record their answers on an overhead transparency or a black/whiteboard. When all answers are displayed, lead students to observe commonalities and differences between the various groups’ recordings. Discuss results by probing students to explain and support their answers. Reveal the correct answers to the class by distributing Table 1 A, Immigration Volume and Rates showing the nations/regions (Handout 4) or making a transparency of it.Answers to Handout 3 are: Ireland--2 Other America--11 Great Britain--1 Mexico--10 Scandanavia and Other NW Europe--3 Africa--8 Australia and Pacific Islands--9 Germany--4 Southern Europe--6 Asia--7 Central and Eastern Europe--5 5. Distribute, a map of Europe (Handout 5), a map of the world (Handout 6), and Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Immigration (Handout 7). Tell students they will use the maps to illustrate the spatial and temporal patterns of immigration to the United States. Handout 7 provides a series of questions for students to answer and tasks to complete. Answers to Handout 7 include: 1. The map of Europe. It would be best because the majority of immigrants during that period of time came from Europe. 2. The world map would best represent immigration at this period of time because of the shift in immigration from Europe to Asia and Latin America. 3. Greatest number of immigrants between 1819 and 1914. Ireland-1820-1854 Great Britain-1855-1873


Download immigration_unit
Our administrator received your request to download this document. We will send you the file to your email shortly.
Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view immigration_unit and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view immigration_unit 2 2 and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?