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CSUN RTM 300 - Influences on child obesity

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1Influences on child obesityInfluences on child obesityKyle NicolsonKyle NicolsonJeff FreundJeff FreundRuben BenitezRuben BenitezSandy MaganaSandy MaganaChild ObesityChild ObesityChildhood obesity is a medical condition that Childhood obesity is a medical condition that affects children. It is characterized by a affects children. It is characterized by a weight well above the mean for their height weight well above the mean for their height and age and a body mass index well above the and age and a body mass index well above the norm. Childhood obesity is considered by norm. Childhood obesity is considered by many to be an "epidemic" in many to be an "epidemic" in thetheUnited United States.States.Over 15% of American children are Over 15% of American children are currently considered obese, and the number currently considered obese, and the number is growing.is growing.2ResearchResearchChildhood obesity results from poor eating habits. In a study ofChildhood obesity results from poor eating habits. In a study of99 children, between 11 and 16 years, professional dietitians pu99 children, between 11 and 16 years, professional dietitians put t the children on a regulated diet program for a nine month periodthe children on a regulated diet program for a nine month period, , leading to an average weight loss of 66 pounds. However, during leading to an average weight loss of 66 pounds. However, during the two year followthe two year follow--up, dieticians discovered that intake of daily up, dieticians discovered that intake of daily calories had increased by 391 calories, leading to weight gain icalories had increased by 391 calories, leading to weight gain in n the subjects. Soft drink consumption may also be an unhealthy the subjects. Soft drink consumption may also be an unhealthy eating/drinking leading to childhood obesity. In a study of 548 eating/drinking leading to childhood obesity. In a study of 548 children during a 19 month period, researchers examined the children during a 19 month period, researchers examined the correlation of soft drink consumption to childhood obesity. correlation of soft drink consumption to childhood obesity. They discovered children were 1.6 times more likely to be obese They discovered children were 1.6 times more likely to be obese for every soft drink consumed each day.( Janssen I, Craig WM, for every soft drink consumed each day.( Janssen I, Craig WM, (2004))(2004))Daily consumption of fast food and junk food has Daily consumption of fast food and junk food has dominated over healthy food choices. Researchers provided dominated over healthy food choices. Researchers provided a lunchtime survey for a one year period to 1681 children, a lunchtime survey for a one year period to 1681 children, ages five to 12 years old. They discovered that although 68% ages five to 12 years old. They discovered that although 68% of the children did have fruit in their lunchboxes, 90% of the of the children did have fruit in their lunchboxes, 90% of the children had junk food in their lunch boxes.children had junk food in their lunch boxes.3In another study an FFFRU (Frequency of Fast Food Restaurant In another study an FFFRU (Frequency of Fast Food Restaurant Use) survey was given to 4,746 students, in grades seven throughUse) survey was given to 4,746 students, in grades seven through12, and researchers discovered that 75% of students had eaten at12, and researchers discovered that 75% of students had eaten ata a fast food restaurant in the past week. Eating out on a regular bfast food restaurant in the past week. Eating out on a regular basis asis has resulted in child weight gain. Researchers studied the dietahas resulted in child weight gain. Researchers studied the dietary ry records of 101 healthy girls, from ages 8records of 101 healthy girls, from ages 8––19 years over a one year 19 years over a one year period and a four to 10 year follow up. They discovered that girperiod and a four to 10 year follow up. They discovered that girls ls who ate quick service food two or more times a week had a BMI z who ate quick service food two or more times a week had a BMI z score (provides comparative measure of body fat accustomed for score (provides comparative measure of body fat accustomed for age) of 0.82, compared to those who ate it less than twice a weeage) of 0.82, compared to those who ate it less than twice a week, k, with a BMI z score of 0.2with a BMI z score of 0.2––0.28.( Whitaker RC, Deeks CM, (2000))0.28.( Whitaker RC, Deeks CM, (2000))Children's food choices are also influenced by family meals. Children's food choices are also influenced by family meals. Researchers provided a household eating questionnaire to 18,177 Researchers provided a household eating questionnaire to 18,177 children, ranging in ages 11children, ranging in ages 11––21, and discovered that four out of 21, and discovered that four out of five parents let their children make their own food decisions. five parents let their children make their own food decisions. They also discovered that compared to adolescents who ate three They also discovered that compared to adolescents who ate three or fewer meals per week, those who ate four to five family mealsor fewer meals per week, those who ate four to five family mealsper week were 19% less likely to report poor consumption of per week were 19% less likely to report poor consumption of vegetables, 22% less likely to report poor consumption of fruitsvegetables, 22% less likely to report poor consumption of fruits, , and 19% less likely to report poor consumption of dairy foods.and 19% less likely to report poor consumption of dairy foods.Adolescents who ate six to seven family meals per week, Adolescents who ate six to seven family meals per week, compared to those who ate three or fewer family meals per week, compared to those who ate three or fewer family meals per week, were 38% less likely to report poor consumption of vegetables, were 38% less likely to report poor consumption of vegetables, 31% less likely to report poor consumption of fruits, and 27% 31% less likely to report poor consumption of fruits, and 27% less likely to report poor consumption of dairy foods.( Ong KK, less likely to report poor consumption of dairy foods.( Ong KK, Ahmed ML, Emmett PM, (2000)) Ahmed ML, Emmett PM, (2000))4Physical inactivity of children has also shown to be a serious Physical inactivity of children has also shown to be a serious


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