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WOU HST 406 - Syllabus

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Week One (10 & 12 Jan): What are archives, and why are they important? Read in resource #1 (chapter 1); resource #2 (intro, section 1); resource #5 (Introduction)Synthesis Essay #1 due 17 January (Tuesday)Week Two (17& 19 Jan): What principles and concepts guide the work of archives? (priorities, assumptions, goals): Read in resource #1 (Appendix B & chapter 13); resource #2 (section 2, 3); resource #3 (entire article); resource #5 (chapters 1& 2); resource #6 (Sections 1-3)—Guest presenterO. Civil War Diaries & Letters Transcription Project, University of Iowa Libraries http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/cwd/transcripts.htmlHist 406/506: Archives Management (TR 2-4 pm) Instructor: Max Geier ([email protected]) Phone: 838-8369Winter 2012 — http://www.wou.edu/~geierm/ Office: HSS 213 Office Hours: Course Objectives: This course is designed as a gateway experience for history students who are considering a possible career in archives management, and it is a pre-requisite for those students who plan to undertake an internship at the Oregon State Archives in Salem. The course is intended to introduce upper-division students majoring in history to the theory and method of archives management, and also provide opportunities for hands-on experience in a group processing project of a particular record group holding at the State Archives, under the direction of archives professionals at that facility. Priorities for this course include the development of an understanding of archives collection management, electronic records management, reference assistance to researchers, and records processing. Students in this course will participate in a group practicum developed in collaboration with archives staff, and will be expected to commit time beyond class meetings in blocks of four hours for such activities. They will develop an ability to understand the nature of archival documents, as recorded information, and the institutions responsible for preserving them; to understand the principles of archival science; to explore methods of retrieving information from archival records, bearing in mind their organization and preservation; to examine management systems for the intellectual and physical control of archival records; and to examine the impact of digital technology on archival management and outreach initiatives. Schedule of Readings, Assignment Deadlines, & Themes for in-class discussion, as required for week of:Week One (10 & 12 Jan): What are archives, and why are they important? Read in resource #1 (chapter 1); resource #2 (intro, section 1); resource #5 (Introduction)Synthesis Essay #1 due 17 January (Tuesday)Week Two (17& 19 Jan): What principles and concepts guide the work of archives? (priorities, assumptions, goals): Read inresource #1 (Appendix B & chapter 13); resource #2 (section 2, 3); resource #3 (entire article); resource #5 (chapters 1& 2); resource #6 (Sections 1-3)—Guest presenterSynthesis Essay #2 due 24 January (Tuesday)Week Three (24 & 26 Jan): What are basic components of an archival program? (tasks, audience, resources): Read in resource #2 (section 4, 5, 6,& 13); resource #5 (chapters 7, 8, 9) –Guest presenter (L. Sawyer)Synthesis Essay #3 due 31 January (Tuesday)Week Four (31 Jan & 2 Feb): How are archival records appraised?: Read in resource #1 (chapter 3); resource #2 (section 3, and review section 4) resource #5 (chapters 3, 4)—Guest presenters (L. Sawyer, E. Passehl)Week 4: Group practicum on-site at Oregon State ArchivesWeek Five (7 & 9 Feb): How are archival records arranged, described, and made available? Read in resource #1 (chapter 5, 6), resource #5 (chapters 5, 6); resource #2 (sections 7, 8, 9, & 11)—Guest presenters (L. Sawyer, E. Passehl)Week 5: Group practicum on-site at Oregon State ArchivesWeek Six (14 & 16 Feb): What are the basic elements of a records management program? Read in resource #1 (chapter 2, 4); resource #2 (section 12)—Guest presenter (M. McRobinson)Week 6: Group practicum on-site at Oregon State ArchivesWeek Seven (21 & 23 Feb): Legal and Ethical Issues related to access and recordkeeping: Read in resource #1 (chapter 7, 8, 9; Review in resource #1 (chapter 13 & Appendix B)—Guest presenter (L. Sawyer)Group practicum on-site at Oregon State ArchivesWeek Eight (28 Feb & 1 March): How has technology influenced archives & records theory and practice? Read inresource #1 (chapters 10, 11, 12); resource #2 (sections 10, 14)—Guest presenter (E. Passehl)Group practicum on-site at Oregon State ArchivesWeek Nine (6 & 8 March): Management of Electronic Records: Read (review) in resource #1 (chapters 10, 12); resource #4(Issue Eight)—Guest presenter (Gerry Handfield)Group practicum on-site at Oregon State ArchivesTerm Report due 13 March (Tuesday)Mini Project due 15 March (Thursday)Week Ten (13 & 15 March): Debriefings on individual projects and group practicumWebsite evaluation due in my office at the time scheduled for final exam (12:00 noon, Thursday 22 March)Opportunity for Grade: Percentage of Grade for the Course Due By1. Synthesis Essays based on assigned readings (weeks 1, 2, & 3) 30 Tuesday of week following in-class discussion2. Web Site evaluation 15 day and time scheduled for final exam3. Contribution to Group practicum efforts 25 weekly participation and term report (wk 10)4. Mini Project (paper on contemp. archival "problem" or concern) 15 Thursday of week 105. Class Participation 15 regular participation in seminar discussions and in-class presentations of assigned readingsRequired Texts (available for purchase at the WUC bookstore): - Gregory Hunter, Developing and Maintaining Practical Archives, 2nd edition (NY: Neil-Schuman, Publishers, 2003)- Terry Eastwood, Heather MacNeil, eds. Currents of Archival Thinking. (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC Clio, 2010)- Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History, 6th edition, (Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's Press, 2010)Assigned Resources: reading assignments and references for projects required to pass this course draw from the following resources (#1-7)and from the weblinks that follow (on-line resources #A-P). Students are responsible for securing access to these materials, as needed, either by purchasing them from on-line suppliers (i.e. Amazon or other bookseller), or by accessing them via inter-library loan, or by downloading pdf versions via on-line links (as indicated below). Reading Assignments are drawn from the


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