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Excess risk of fatal coronary heart disease




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doi:10.1136/bmj.38678.389583.7C 2006;332;73-78; originally published online 21 Dec 2005; BMJ Rachel Huxley, Federica Barzi and Mark Woodward meta-analysis of 37 prospective cohort studies associated with diabetes in men and women: Excess risk of fatal coronary heart disease http://bmj.com/cgi/content/full/332/7533/73 Updated information and services can be found at: These include: Data supplement http://bmj.com/cgi/content/full/bmj.38678.389583.7C/DC1 "Extra figures" References http://bmj.com/cgi/content/full/332/7533/73#BIBL This article cites 40 articles, 19 of which can be accessed free at: Rapid responses http://bmj.com/cgi/eletter-submit/332/7533/73 You can respond to this article at: service Email alerting box at the top right corner of the article Receive free email alerts when new articles cite this article - sign up in the Notes http://www.bmjjournals.com/cgi/reprintform To order reprints of this article go to: http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/subscriptions/subscribe.shtml go to: BMJTo subscribe to on 13 January 2006 bmj.comDownloaded from Research Excess risk of fatal coronary heart disease associated with diabetes in men and women: meta-analysis of 37 prospective cohort studies Rachel Huxley, Federica Barzi, Mark Woodward Abstract Objective To estimate the relative risk for fatal coronary heart disease associated with diabetes in men and women. Design Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Data sources Studies published between 1966 and March 2005, identified through Embase and Medline, using a combined text word and MESH heading search strategy, in addition to studies from the Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration. Review methods Studies were eligible if they had reported estimates of the relative risk for fatal coronary heart disease comparing men and women with and without diabetes. Studies were excluded if the estimates were not adjusted at least for age. Results 37 studies of type 2 diabetes and fatal coronary heart disease among a total of 447 064 patients were identified. The rate of fatal coronary heart disease was higher in patients with diabetes than in those without (5.4 v 1.6%). The overall summary relative risk for fatal coronary heart disease in patients with diabetes compared with no diabetes was significantly greater among women than it was among men: 3.50, 95% confidence interval 2.70 to 4.53 v 2.06, 1.81 to 2.34. After exclusion of the eight studies that had adjusted only for age, the difference in risk between the sexes was substantially reduced but still highly significant. The pooled ratio of the relative risks (women: men) from the 29 studies with multiple adjusted estimates was 1.46 (1.14 to 1.88). Conclusions The relative risk for fatal coronary heart disease associated with diabetes is 50% higher in women than it is in men. This greater excess coronary risk may be explained by more adverse cardiovascular risk profiles among women with diabetes, combined with possible disparities in treatment that favour men. Introduction Type 2 diabetes has long been known as a risk factor for coronary heart disease and is conservatively estimated to increase the risk of a fatal event by twofold.1 2 The association between diabetes and coronary heart disease has been suggested to be stronger in women than in men, prompting the idea that diabetes eliminates, or substantially attenuates, the advantages of being female.3 Within the past decade three ...





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